Kee Malesky

NPR listeners often ask, "What is her name anyway - Keema Leski, Kim Alesky, Kay Marlenski, or what?" Her name is Kee Malesky, nee Christine Mary Shields, of Brooklyn, N.Y. The "Christine" became "Kee" when her youngest sister learned to talk, and because she thought it was a really cool name, she stuck with it.

With her colleagues in the Reference Library, Kee Malesky performs background research, answers fact-checking questions, finds experts and story ideas, and provides guidance to staff on grammar, usage, and pronunciations (but don't blame her when someone says "nook-yoo-ler"). She coordinates the library's internal News Wiki, and has also worked on special projects for NPR -- producing Election Night briefing books, documenting the early history of the network, and assisting with journalist training projects.

Kee has been married since 1970 to Robert Malesky, who was the senior producer of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday for twenty years. However, they are not on the official "NPR Couples" list because they met and married before either of them came to NPR.

After several years as an administrative drudge for NPR, Kee abandoned the network to get her Masters degree in Library Science from The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. She had planned to find a position deep in an archive somewhere with no human contact, but was lured back to NPR by her friends in the Broadcast Library in 1984. After cataloguing NPR programs for three years, Kee became the staff librarian for the original version of NPR's arts magazine program, Performance Today, and then moved to the News Reference Library in 1990.

Breaking the Mold: The Kee Malesky Story (2003) is a completely fictional account of Kee's early life. Producer Josh Seftel, working on a documentary about environmental science, asked Kee for permission to use her name for the character, a high school girl who enjoys research and finds the solution to a house mold problem that is making people sick. Aired on PBS and at film festivals around the country, the short film has been well-received by reviewers and audiences. The Providence Journal called it "a zanily eccentric tale."

In 2009, Kee took some time off to write All Facts Considered; The Essential Library of Inessential Knowledge (Wiley 2010), a compendium of interesting and unusual facts that she has accumulated during more than two decades answering questions for NPR reporters, editors, and hosts.

In her copious spare time, Kee collects books and New York City memorabilia, enjoys European travel, and works on her family genealogy. She was the subject of a chapter in Super Searchers in the News: The Online Secrets of Journalists and News Researchers (2000, Information Today Inc.) and co-authored the entry on "News Libraries" for the electronic edition of the Encyclopedia of Library & Information Science (2003). Kee has been a member of the adjunct faculty of Catholic University's School of Library and Information Science, and is active in the Special Libraries Association and in Beta Phi Mu, the international honor society of library science.

 

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5:10pm

Sat July 13, 2013
The Two-Way

In The Royal Baby Guessing Game, What's The Surname?

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 4:32 pm

A worker of a games company poses with placards depicting a 'royal baby' near the St. Mary's Hospital Lindo Wing in London on Thursday. While Buckingham Palace has been mum on the subject, Saturday was rumored to be the official due date for the child who will become the third in line to the British throne.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Plantagenets, Tudors, Stuarts, Hanovers and now what?

There's been plenty of speculation about what name will be chosen for the first child of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (better known as Will and Kate). Bets are being placed on Charlotte, Alice, Grace, Charles, George, James, etc. (see more possibilities below).

But what about a surname for the little tyke?

According to the BBC:

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9:26am

Sun November 25, 2012
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

The Only Woman To Receive The Medal Of Honor

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 10:42 am

A portrait of Mary Walker from the National Archives.
Mathew Brady NARA

In all of American history, only one woman has been awarded the Medal of Honor — and Congress tried to take it back.

Her name was Mary Edwards Walker, and she was a doctor at a time when female physicians were rare. She graduated from the Syracuse Medical College, and at the outbreak of the Civil War traveled to Washington with the intention of joining the Army as a medical officer. When she was rejected, she volunteered as a surgeon and served in that capacity for various units through the war years, continually agitating for a commission.

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7:11am

Sun October 21, 2012
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

The Strangely True Tale Of Johnny Appleseed

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 1:07 pm

He's legend now, but Johnny Appleseed was as odd as his myth.
Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Apples — right off the tree, baked in a pie, pressed into cider or mashed into sauce — are a basic element of American culture. October is the month to celebrate them, thanks, in part, to Johnny Appleseed.

You've probably heard of the legendary character who traveled the Midwest planting trees, but he's not a myth. Johnny Appleseed's real name was John Chapman, and he was born in Massachusetts in either 1774 or 1775.

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1:36pm

Sat July 28, 2012
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

Live Pigeon Shooting And Other Odd Olympic Games

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 1:11 pm

Leon de Lunden of Belgium won the live pigeon shooting event at the 1900 Olympics in Paris — the only time in Olympic history when animals were killed on purpose.
Popperfoto/Getty Images

The 1900 Olympic Games in Paris hosted what was surely the weirdest and most bizarre Olympic event of all time: live pigeon shooting.

The winner was Leon de Lunden of Belgium, who bagged 21 of the 300 birds that were released to the gun-toting competitors. Perhaps the sight of all those gory feathers fluttering down from the Olympic sky was too horrible for the audience and the organizers; the event never returned.

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10:15am

Sat June 16, 2012
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

Follow The Money: On The Trail Of Watergate Lore

A photograph of the Watergate complex that was used as an exhibit in the trial of G. Gordon Liddy.
National Archives

"Follow the money" – a phrase that's now part of our national lexicon — was supposedly whispered to reporter Bob Woodward by Deep Throat as a way to cut through the lies and deceptions and find the truth about the Watergate scandal. The so-called third-rate burglary that happened 40 years ago this weekend ended the presidency of Richard Nixon. But did Mark Felt, the former associate director of the FBI who admitted to being Deep Throat in 2005, ever really say "follow the money"?

He did not.

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