Laura Roman

Writing a couplet can be tough,
But when you work with friends, it's not so rough.

On Monday, NPR's Morning Edition asked listeners and readers to share poems about the teams in their lives — both on and off the court.

The sun is out. Flowers are blooming. Spring is here — finally.

Each year, spring is coupled with a celebration of beauty, expression and the rhythmic qualities of language: We are talking about poetry.

April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate, NPR's Morning Edition wants you to share a couplet, and author Kwame Alexander will pick a few and transform them into one, grand poem. But there's a catch: Your poem must be about teamwork.

Share a couplet about the presence of teamwork in your life, on or off the court, be that literally or metaphorically.

Facebook is notifying the 87 million users whose information may have been compromised and given to Cambridge Analytica.

NPR's Morning Edition wants to hear from Facebook users who have received such a notification. We would also like to know if you have ever thought about leaving Facebook or if you have deactivated your account for a period of time.

Anna Fiehler, 56, jokes that she was one of the first people to date online. She may not be wrong.

It's peak online dating season.

According to Match.com, late December through Valentine's Day is the busiest time of the year for dating apps and sites. It's sometimes called "cuffing season" — a nod to the idea that people want to find a serious relationship during the cold months.

We praise athletes, at every level, for their ability to compete, to dazzle, to perform under pressure, to inspire and — maybe most importantly — to win.

And when they fall down, when they tear, break or injure themselves, they promise to pick themselves back up, come back stronger than ever and carry their team to victory — thus solidifying their seemingly superhuman performance.

But what goes into recovery? How do athletes get better? And then how do they stay healthy?

Often, recovery — and general pain management in sports — involves medication.

After 14 years in the NFL, Anquan Boldin is ending one career to begin another. The 36-year-old Super Bowl champion and potential Hall of Famer is leaving football to focus on social activism and charity work full time.

Just last month, Boldin signed a one-year deal with the Buffalo Bills. But not even two weeks later, he quit.

"Football takes up a huge amount of your time," Boldin tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "I wanted to be able to spend as much time as I felt was needed to work on advocacy."

Do you ever feel like social media apps are a waste of time? A new app called Binky sets out to prove that point.

Open Binky and you'll find an infinite list of random stuff: Llamas. Hot sauce. Joan of Arc. Much like Twitter, Binky displays posts on a timeline. Unlike Twitter, nothing you do matters.

See an image you like? Swipe right! See an image that makes you sad? Swipe left! Do you relate to that photo of Amelia Earhart on a deep spiritual level and feel that you must, must share it? Re-bink that! Do it!

When Yomi Wrong was born in 1972, doctors told her mother, Sarah Churchill, the newborn may die during the night.

Yomi was born with a rare genetic disorder called osteogenesis imperfecta, which causes bones to break under the slightest pressure.

"Your skull was fractured; your arms, your ribs," Sarah explained to her daughter at StoryCorps in San Francisco, Calif. Doctors told Sarah the best thing to do was to leave Yomi in the hospital because she probably wouldn't survive.

Well, he did it — sort of.

In April, Carter Wilkerson set out on a mission to get free chicken nuggets for a year. What he may not have known was that his inquiry would become the most retweeted tweet of all time.

It was his fondness for nuggets that inspired Wilkerson to ask Wendy's how many retweets he needed to get free chicken nuggets for a year. Wendy's, playing along, set the bar high: 18 million.

Challenge accepted.