Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He was a fixture on the campaign trail throughout 2008, traveling extensively with Senator John McCain to cover the Arizona senator's bid for the presidency.

Horsley comes to the White House beat from the west coast, where he covered the economy and energy as NPR's San Diego-based business correspondent. He also helped cover the 2004 presidential campaign, and reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis. He also worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. He began his professional career in 1987 as a production assistant for NPR in Washington.

Born and raised in Denver, Colorado, Horsley received a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

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3:06am

Wed May 7, 2014
Politics

Obama Sounds Alarm Bell On Climate Change. Is Anyone Listening?

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 6:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Everybody makes conversation about the weather. And today that includes President Obama. He's appearing on three network TV shows to discuss a new government report on climate change. It's on a day when the president also visits Arkansas to survey the damage from last week's tornadoes.

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9:08am

Sat May 3, 2014
Media

Poised And Persistent, Reporter Broke White House Color Barrier

Originally published on Sat May 3, 2014 10:33 am

Reporter Harry McAlpin leaves the White House in 1944. McAlpin was the first black reporter to cover a presidential press conference. He'll be honored Saturday at the Correspondents' Dinner.
George Skadding Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Hollywood starlets will mingle with politicians and even humble reporters in Washington on Saturday night. That can only mean one thing: the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner. The black-tie event has evolved into a glitzy celebrity roast, but it began as a simple chance for journalists to break bread with the presidents they cover.

This year, the White House Correspondents' Association is celebrating its 100th anniversary, and it plans to posthumously honor the first African-American reporter to cover a presidential news conference.

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3:08pm

Wed April 30, 2014
Politics

Minimum Wage Raise: Blocked For Now, May Live Again In Campaigns

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 9:20 pm

Senate Republicans blocked a vote Wednesday on a bill to raise the nation's minimum wage. But don't expect that to be the end of the story.

For more than a year now, Democrats, including President Obama, have been pushing to boost the minimum wage. Their latest target is $10.10 an hour.

GOP critics argue that would depress hiring in an already weak job market.

But raising the wage is popular with voters, and Democrats plan to make the issue a rallying cry between now and the November elections.

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2:03pm

Tue April 29, 2014
News

In Diplomacy, Obama Aims To 'Hit Singles,' Not Swing For Fences

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 5:40 pm

President Obama was at Fort Bonifacio in Taguig, Philippines, on Tuesday, during the last leg of his four-nation tour through the Asia-Pacific region.
Carolyn Kaster AP

President Obama returned to Washington on Tuesday after a weeklong visit to Asia.

The four-nation tour was designed to showcase U.S. involvement in the region, but it produced only modest diplomatic developments. And toward the end of the trip, the president offered a modest assessment of his overall foreign policy.

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3:20am

Fri April 11, 2014
Politics

Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius To Step Down

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:37 am

The move comes about 6 months after the disastrous roll out of the health insurance website. It was eventually fixed, but not before delivering a severe blow to the president's approval ratings.

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