Sonari Glinton

NPR Business Reporter Sonari Glinton covers the auto industry and transportation. His reports can be heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition Saturday and Sunday.

Glinton came to NPR in August 2007 and worked as a producer for All Things Considered for three years. During that time he produced interviews with everyone from UN Ambassador Susan Rice to Joan Rivers. The highlight for Glinton came when he produced Robert Siegel’s 50 Great Voices piece on Nat King Cole.

Prior to NPR, Glinton spent four years at WBEZ working his way up from intern. While in Chicago he covered the Cook County Board of Commissioners and the late legendary Cook County Board President John Stroger.

For his work on a series uncovering abuse at the Cook Juvenile Temporary Detention Center, Glinton was honored with the Society of Professional Journalist’s Sigma Delta Chi Award for Investigative Reporting.

Glinton’s first name, Sonari, comes from the southern Nigeria language Ijo and means “God hears our cry.” Born and raised in Chicago's South Shore neighborhood, Glinton cheers for the White Sox, Bears and the Bulls in that order. He's also a rabid jazz and Frank Sinatra fan who owns every Sinatra-released recording from 1953-1993. He attended Boston University.

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3:00pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Around the Nation

Minnesotans Fed Up With State Government

It's Day 2 of Minnesota's state government shutdown. No negotiations are expected until after July Fourth, and with state parks closed and government offices shuttered, many Minnesota residents are already restless.

3:49pm

Thu June 30, 2011
Business

Toyota Steers Ads To Bring In More Minority Buyers

Customers walk past a Toyota FJ Cruiser. Toyota brought in 19 percent of African-American buyers, 22 percent of Latino buyers and 33 percent of Asian-American buyers.
Yoshikazu Tsuno Getty Images

The Japanese automaker Toyota has taken its fair share of hits in the past year and a half: The earthquake and tsunami in Japan as well as last year's recall fiasco have helped erode the company's share of the U.S. car market.

But one place Toyota remains No. 1 is with minority car buyers — Latinos, African-Americans and Asian-Americans continue to buy more Toyotas than any other car brand, domestic or foreign.

Toyota's claim on the minority market has the Rev. Jesse Jackson questioning other car companies' practices.

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4:08pm

Tue June 28, 2011
Economy

Americans Remain Unsure Of Economy's Future

Although the recession ended two years ago, Americans are still feeling the effects. Consumers are continuing to rely on thrifty measures to push their money further.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Nearly two years after the official end of the recession, Americans still remain unconvinced.

Consumer confidence has hit an eight-month low, according to a Conference Board report released Tuesday. The group studies how Americans feel about business conditions and the job market.

It turns out consumers aren't feeling so hot about the prospects for the future, which economists say could be a self-fulfilling prophecy.

This can be seen in any parking lot of a big-box store.

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5:29pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Economy

Weak Jobs Market Takes Heavier Toll On Black Men

People looking for jobs wait in line to speak with potential employers at the Brooklyn Job Fair on April 13 in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

President Obama spent Friday pushing job creation in manufacturing, but he's getting increasing pressure for job results from a key part of his base: African Americans.

The unemployment rate for black men is about double the national average — and economists don't expect that number to fall to the single digits anywhere in the near future.

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4:57pm

Wed June 22, 2011
Economy

Auto Industry Adjusts To New Normal: Low Sales

A salesman looks at Ford Fusion cars with customers on the lot at the Serramonte Ford dealership in Colma, Calif. This year, Ford Motor Co. reported its best first-quarter earnings since 1998, at $2.6 billion.
David Paul Morris Getty Images

The U.S. auto market is slowly rebounding. But even as sales increase, they're still not at the peaks hit 10 years ago. In 2000 and 2001, more than 17 million automobiles were sold in America. Last year, just under 12 million were sold.

But many analysts, dealers and executives believe the industry is actually healthier selling far fewer cars.

"That 16 to 17 million sales level that we experienced was not a normal situation," says Jeremy Anwyl, CEO of car site Edmunds.com.

He says a lot of the factors that kept car sales high won't be seen again.

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