Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts with Renee Montagne.

Inskeep has traveled across the nation and around the world for Morning Edition and NPR News. From the Persian Gulf to the wreckage of New Orleans, he has interviewed presidents, warlords, authors, and musicians, as well as those who aren't in the headlines — from a steelworker in Ohio to a woman living in poverty in Tehran.

Inskeep's first full-time assignment for NPR was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush.

After the September 11 attacks, Inskeep covered the war in Afghanistan, the hunt for al-Qaeda suspects in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid that went wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of the NPR News team that was awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for its coverage of Iraq.

In 2004, Inskeep joined a team that reshaped Morning Edition. Today Morning Edition aggressively covers breaking news, and also, in Inskeep's words, "tries to slow down the news – make sense of information that flies by too quickly, and check glib statements against the facts."

He led Morning Edition teams that hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," a series on conflict in Nigeria.

During the 2008 Presidential campaign, Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris co-hosted "The York Project," a groundbreaking series of conversations about race. Fifteen Pennsylvanians met to talk for hours about a subject that's constantly mentioned, yet not often frankly discussed. This series received a duPont silver baton for excellence.

Although his job often calls for him to deliver bad news, Inskeep looks for the humanity in hard times — and the humor. "I'm inspired," he says, "by the Langston Hughes book Laughing to Keep From Crying. And I'm inspired by people like the Bordelons, who've spoken with us ever since they rode out Hurricane Katrina. At the beginning, they sometimes laughed and cried in the same sentence. Laughter means you survived."

Before coming to NPR, Inskeep worked for public and commercial radio stations in and around New York City. He has written articles for publications including The New York Times and Washington Post. He is also the author of a forthcoming book on the world's growing urban areas, tentatively titled Instant City.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a 1990 graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

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2:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Around the Nation

Protesters Clash With Police In Oakland

About 3,000 people gathered at the Port of Oakland Wednesday, and effectively shut it down. People flooded the port area and blocked exits. The protest remained largely peaceful until the late evening, when police responded to a bonfire.

2:50am

Wed November 2, 2011
7 Billion And Counting

In Karachi, New Aspirations To Be A Global Player

The population of Karachi, Pakistan, has been boosted by a new influx of young people. And now the city, seen here during a political rally in January, is making a bid to attract global elites.

Rizwan Tabassum AFP/Getty Images

This week, we're asking what it really means to live in a world with 7 billion people. For some answers, we visit Karachi, Pakistan.

The grandest expression of the world's population growth is in the word "megacity." Dozens of these cities of more than 10 million now ring the globe, like a string of oversized pearls. In a megacity, people and ideas clash: The ancient collides with the modern; secular with religious; global with local. In Karachi, Pakistan, those forces can be seen in the story of a single piece of real estate.

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6:15am

Tue October 18, 2011
Middle East

Freed Soldier Gilad Shalit Returns To Israel

Looking thin, weary and dazed, Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit returned home Tuesday from more than five years of captivity in the Gaza Strip. In exchange, hundreds of Palestinian prisoners were released.

4:55am

Tue October 18, 2011
Africa

Hillary Clinton Travels To Libya

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is visiting Libya, where she will meet with members of the National Transitional Council. This is the first time a cabinet-level official from the U.S. has traveled to Libya since 2008.

2:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Economy

Occupy Wall Street Protests Spread To Europe

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 4:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Cleanup is under way in cities around the world after a weekend of protests. Tens of thousands of people turned out. They protested greedy bankers, inept politicians, government austerity, the growing gap between rich and poor, and above all, the system that runs the global economy.

There was some violence in Rome, dozens of arrests. Other places were more peaceful. And in London on this Monday, the protests are still going on. So let's talk about that and more with NPR's Philip Reeves, who's on the line. Hi, Philip.

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