Susan Stamberg

Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is special correspondent for NPR. Stamberg is the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program, and has won every major award in broadcasting. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the Radio Hall of Fame. Beginning in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of NPR's award-winning newsmagazine All Things Considered for 14 years. She then hosted Weekend Edition Sunday, and now serves as guest host of NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Saturday, in addition to reporting on cultural issues for all the NPR programs.

One of the most popular broadcasters in public radio, Stamberg is well-known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story. Her interviewing has been called "fresh," "friendly, down-to-earth," and (by novelist E.L. Doctorow) "the closest thing to an enlightened humanist on the radio." Her thousands of interviews include conversations with Laura Bush, Billy Crystal, Rosa Parks, Dave Brubeck, and Luciano Pavarotti. Stamberg is one of the pioneers of NPR, on staff since the network began in 1971.

Prior to joining NPR, she served as producer, program director, and general manager of NPR member station WAMU-FM/Washington, DC. Stamberg is the author of two books, and co-editor of a third. TALK: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things chronicles her two decades with NPR. Her first book, Every Night at Five: Susan Stamberg's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED Book, was published in 1982 by Pantheon. Stamberg also co-edited The Wedding Cake in the Middle of the Road, published in 1992 by W. W. Norton. That collection grew out of a series of stories Stamberg commissioned for Weekend Edition Sunday.

In addition to her Hall of Fame inductions, other recognitions include the Armstrong and duPont Awards, the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ohio State University's Golden Anniversary Director's Award, the Distinguished Broadcaster Award from the American Women in Radio and Television. A native of New York City, Stamberg earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, and has been awarded numerous honorary degrees including a Doctor of Humane Letters from Dartmouth College. She is a Fellow of Silliman College, Yale University, and has served on the boards of the PEN/Faulkner Fiction Award Foundation and the National Arts Journalism Program based at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Stamberg has hosted a number of series on PBS, moderated three Fred Rogers television specials for adults, served as commentator, guest or co-host on various commercial TV programs, and appeared as a narrator in performance with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra. Her voice appeared on Broadway in the Wendy Wasserstein play An American Daughter.

Her husband, Louis C. Stamberg, passed away in 2007. Their son Joshua is an actor.

 

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10:01pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Food

Mrs. Stamberg's Relish Goes To Washington

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:16 am

Thanksgiving At The White House: First families have a lot to be thankful for — including the world-class chefs who make their food. Susan Stamberg shares her mother-in-law's cranberry relish recipe with two veteran presidential chefs. They say it reminds them of the infamous "cheddar cheese ring" from the Carter administration.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

All families have Thanksgiving traditions, and longtime NPR listeners know that Susan Stamberg is always willing to divulge her own. Every year since 1972, Stamberg has shared her mother-in-law's now famous cranberry relish recipe on the radio. Stamberg says the relish — a shocking pink, like Pepto-Bismol — sounds terrible, but tastes terrific.

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10:01pm

Wed November 9, 2011
Fine Art

For Gertrude Stein, Collecting Art Was A Family Affair

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:20 am

The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

A reunion of art is taking place in Paris right now. Works that haven't been there together in almost a century are reunited once again. The art was collected by writer Gertrude Stein and her brothers starting in the early 1900s. The Steins bought paintings right out of the studios of young avant-garde artists — Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and others who would become masters as the 20th century progressed.

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10:01pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Fine Art

Andy Warhol's 'Headline': Sensationalism Always Sells

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 12:52 pm

By 1985, Warhol's style had evolved substantially; on this untitled headline piece, he collaborated with Keith Haring.
National Gallery of Art

Pop artist Andy Warhol died in 1987, but he's making his presence felt around the nation's capital these days. He's featured in an art fair, in restaurants, in galleries and in two major museums. The Hirschhorn Museum is exhibiting silkscreens and paintings Warhol did — of photographs of shadows. And the National Gallery of Art has its first one-man Warhol show, Headlines, focused on a series of paintings he made of Page One tabloid headlines.

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10:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Fine Art

At Maison Lesage, Beauty Embroidered By Hand

In 1992, Lesage started an embroidery school to pass on to a new generation the techniques of an art form threatened by mass-produced fashion.
Olivier Saillant Maison Lesage

A friend's son recently got a tattoo — and she was appalled. Forty years ago, she'd given birth to a perfect, pink-skinned cherub. Now, bright blue wings, dark red hearts and some birds were inscribed on his bicep. Comfort, however, came in the words of France's top embroiderer: "It's human nature to want to look different," said Francois Lesage. "Self-adornment goes back to the Lascaux Caves! Think of scarification. That's the ancestor of embroidery."

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10:01pm

Wed August 17, 2011
Theater

Wendy Wasserstein, 'Lost' And Found

From the late 1970s until her death in 2006, at the age of 55, playwright Wendy Wasserstein was a force in the New York theatre. She won the Pulitzer, the Tony and many other awards for writing about her generation of educated, successful women struggling to balance their professional and family lives.

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