Sylvia Poggioli

Senior European Correspondent, Foreign Desk

Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's foreign desk and reports from Rome, Italy; the Balkans; other parts of Europe; and the Middle East. Poggioli can be heard on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Since joining NPR's foreign desk in 1982, Poggioli's on-air analysis has encompassed the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the turbulent civil war in the former Yugoslavia, and noteworthy coverage from Prague. In early 1991, she supplemented NPR's Gulf War coverage, reporting from London on European reactions to events surrounding the war.

In 2004, Poggioli was the inaugural recipient of the WBUR Foreign Correspondent Award, presented to an outstanding public radio foreign correspondent. In 2002, Poggioli received the Welles Hangen Award for Distinquished Journalism from Brown University. In 2000, Poggioli received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Brandeis University. In 1994, Poggioli was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences "for her distinctive, cultivated and authoritative reports on 'ethnic cleansing' in Bosnia." In 1990, Poggioli spent an academic year at Harvard University as a research fellow at Harvard University's Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

From 1971 to 1986, Poggioli served as an editor on the English-language desk for the Ansa News Agency in Italy. Prior to her duties as editor, she worked at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. She was actively involved with women's film and theater groups.

Poggioli's reports on the Bosnian conflict earned two awards in 1993: the George Foster Peabody Award and the Edward Weintal Journalism Prize. She also won two awards in 1994, the National Women's Political Caucus/Radcliffe College Exceptional Merit Media Award and the Silver Angel Excellence in the Media Award. Poggioli was part of the NPR team that won the 2000 Overseas Press Club award for coverage of NATO's 1999 air war against Yugoslavia.

The daughter of Italian anti-fascists who were forced to flee Italy under Mussolini, Poggioli was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated from Harvard College in 1968 with a bachelor's degree in romance languages and literature. She later studied in Italy under a Fulbright Scholarship.

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2:00am

Thu October 13, 2011
Europe

Italy's Parliament To Vote On Berlusconi's Future

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 12:04 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Turns out it's one thing for Italy's prime minister to live a scandalous private life, it's another to do that during a major economic crisis. Silvio Berlusconi is fighting for the survival of his center-right government and he faces growing discontent within his own party over his lifestyle and judicial woes. Berlusconi's called today for a vote of confidence in Italy's parliament. That vote is expected tomorrow. And as NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, Berlusconi's political test comes as Italy is engulfed in the eurozone debt crisis.

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1:41pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Europe

Greek Prime Minister: Undoing His Father's Legacy

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou addresses a meeting of the Federation of German Industry in Berlin, Sept. 27. He is the son and grandson of Greek prime ministers, but his critics say he is betraying the work of his father, who built up the Greek welfare state.

John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

Greek Prime Minster George Papandreou, who was born and raised in the U.S., belongs to Greece's most important political dynasty — he's the son and grandson of prime ministers.

And yet just two years after he led the Socialist party to victory, his popularity has plummeted, his debt-stricken country is at the heart of the eurozone crisis and he faces the daunting task of dismantling the generous welfare state his father created.

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10:01pm

Mon October 3, 2011
World

Tough Choices For Greece's Youth In Economic Crisis

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 6:19 pm

Stella Kasdagli, 30, and her husband Alexandros Karamalikis, 35, are trying to make ends meet. Karamalikis lost his job and and is now a stay-at-home father, raising their 13-month-old daughter

Sylvia Poggioli NPR

The financial crisis gripping Greece is having a major impact on the country's young people. A two-tier labor market that favors the older generation and draconian austerity measures have triggered a record high jobless rate among those under 35.

And now, the economic upheaval is undermining the traditional family structure and pushing the young to leave their homeland for better prospects.

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2:00am

Wed September 21, 2011
Europe

Speculation Grows That Greece Will Default On Its Debts

Greek leaders yesterday held a second telephone conference with the IMF, the European Union and the European Central bank. Greece is hoping for approval of the next scheduled payment of bailout money. There is growing speculation that Greece will default on its debts. The only questions are how and when, and if Greece can still stay within the eurozone.

2:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Europe

Greece Tries To Show It Can Reduce Budget Deficit

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 1:43 pm

A woman walks past an advertisement of the national lottery in Athens. Public outrage over austerity measures is intense, and a new levy on real estate has been dubbed the "monster tax."
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

It's a critical period for Greece: It has to convince international lenders that it can slash its budget deficit before getting a vital $11 billion installment of last year's $150 billion bailout deal.

Prime Minister George Papandreou canceled a trip to the U.S. to hold an emergency Cabinet meeting Sunday on finding more cuts to plug this year's budget shortfall. Greece has blamed the shortfall on a deeper-than-expected recession — the unintended effect of a year and a half of draconian austerity measures.

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