Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi joined NPR News in May 2008 as a correspondent. She is a general assignment reporter covering business for NPR's National Desk. She began reporting for NPR in Washington during hectic times, with the 2008 presidential race underway and as the economy started to experience severe turmoil. Her stories have ranged from declines in SUV sales at Carmax to profiles of important figures involved in the Wall Street bailout. Noguchi's pieces can be heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition Sunday.

Before joining NPR, Noguchi worked at The Washington Post, first as a reporter and later as an editor. Starting in 1999, she covered economic development. Starting in 2000, she covered telecommunications and wrote stories about the major industry mergers, the Federal Communications Commission and the rise of some of the Internet giants. On the side, she also wrote about her love of swing dancing. Later, she covered consumer technology, writing features about people and their relationships with their gadgets. This was her favorite beat. Most recently, Noguchi directed the paper's coverage of national technology news. Prior to joining the Post, Noguchi reported on business and politics for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle and The Orlando Sentinel.

Noguchi's parents left Japan to study in the U.S. in the early 1970s. Noguchi and her younger brother grew up in St. Louis. She received her B.A. in history from Yale University. During a year off, she studied in Yokohama, Japan, and worked for Kyodo News Service in Tokyo. She is fluent in Japanese and speaks conversational German. She has forgotten the bulk of a class in Arabic.

Noguchi lives with her husband, Christopher Libertelli, in Bethesda, Maryland. Outside of NPR she practices yoga and still loves swing dancing.

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2:00am

Mon November 14, 2011
Business

Holiday Sales Expected To Be Better Than Last Year

Analysts are predicting a fairly good year for retailers over the holiday season. Those sales are expected to increase 3 percent overall and go up 15 percent for online retailers. Plus, this is the first year tablets like the iPad may make an impact on the retail landscape.

2:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
Business

Jon Corzine's Appetite For Hair-Raising Challenges

The sudden bankruptcy of commodities trading firm MF Global has thrust a familiar name in to the spotlight: Jon Corzine. Previously, Corzine was governor of New Jersey, a U.S. senator and chairman and CEO of the investment firm Goldman Sachs. Corzine resigned last week as chairman and CEO of MF Global as investigators search for hundreds of millions of dollars missing from clients' accounts.

6:43am

Fri November 4, 2011
Business

MF Global CEO Steps Down

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 8:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Jon Corzine out of a job.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The Wall Street veteran and former governor of New Jersey stepped down today from his latest high-powered job as chairman and CEO of the securities firm MF Global. That company filed for bankruptcy earlier this week.

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1:00pm

Tue November 1, 2011
Business

Investigators Scour Books Of MF Global

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 3:40 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And I'm Guy Raz. Investigators are poring over the books of MF Global today. They're trying to figure out what happened to several hundred million dollars. The investment firm, run by former New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine, filed for bankruptcy yesterday. It failed in large part because it made ill-timed multibillion dollar bets on European debt. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports on where all that missing money could have gone.

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2:34am

Fri October 28, 2011
Economy

The Rising Cost Of Doing Business With Greece

Greek's economic problems work their way down the supply chain to people like Kosta Bouyoukas, who imports olives and other foods from Greece. He says suppliers are changing the terms of contracts, and sometimes products don't show up at all.

Helga Csenki iStockphoto.com

As details of the Greek debt deal passed by the European Union Wednesday are worked out, some businesses in the U.S. continue to grapple with the ripple effects of the prolonged debt crisis.

The EU hopes the debt deal will contain Europe's debt problems, and the problem countries will now start their work of implementing fiscal reforms — which has proved troublesome, especially in Greece.

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