All Things Considered

Weekday Evenings 2-3, 3:30 - 5:30, & 6-7
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Jackie Fortier

Breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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12:00pm

Sat September 24, 2011
Music Interviews

Ivy: Speaking The Shared Language Of Pop

Ivy's new album is All Hours. Left to right: Adam Schlesinger, Dominique Durand, Andy Chase.
Courtesy of the artist

In 1989, Dominique Durand left her home in Paris to live in New York. Her goal was simple: to learn English. But fate took over, and five years later she became the frontwoman for the indie pop band Ivy.

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3:44pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Politics

Secretary of State files a Lawsuit Against Denver Clerk and Recorder

Raj Chohan

Colorado’s Secretary of State filed a lawsuit against the city of Denver this week in advance of November’s election. It’s one the topics that our media partners at Colorado Public Television and “Colorado Inside Out” are discussing.

2:51pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Music Interviews

Wild Flag: Making Chaos Useful

Wild Flag's self-titled debut album was released earlier this month. Left to right: Rebecca Cole, Carrie Brownstein, Mary Timony, Janet Weiss.
Courtesy of the artist

Carrie Brownstein helped start Sleater-Kinney, the celebrated punk trio, when she was still in college. That band split in 2006, and though Brownstein kept busy — as a blogger and commentator for NPR Music, among other things — she says that by the end of 2010, she was feeling antsy.

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1:07pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Music Interviews

The Mad Musical Scientist Of Burbank, Calif.

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 9:50 am

Composer and sound designer Diego Stocco at work.
Courtesy of the artist

"I was probably 12 when I trashed my first electric guitar," Diego Stocco says. "I totally disassembled it, and I wasn't able to put it back together."

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1:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Space

NASA: Satellite's Rate Of Descent Has Slowed

We reported on the variables that make it hard to, even at this late date, predict exactly when and where a dead 6-ton NASA satellite will fall to Earth. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, or UARS, will be the biggest NASA spacecraft to crash back to Earth, but it's now baffling scientists as its descent toward Earth slows — delaying its ultimate crash until the early part of the weekend. The space agency is now predicting the satellite will crash down to Earth late Friday or early Saturday, Eastern Time.

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