All Things Considered

Weekday Evenings 2-3, 3:30 - 5:30, & 6-7
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Jackie Fortier

Breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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1:00pm

Sun August 7, 2011
NPR Story

Asian Leaders Keep Quiet To Avoid Roiling Markets

As financial markets open in Asia, we get an early sign of the impact of the U.S. credit downgrade. Guest host David Greene talks with NPR's Anthony Kuhn, who is in Jakarta.

1:00pm

Sun August 7, 2011
NPR Story

Yemenis Find Consensus On Saleh's Need To Go

Yemen's injured president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, has just been released from a Saudi hospital. NPR's Kelly McEvers, who is in the Yemen capital Sanaa, tells guest host David Greene about her travels across that country and the one thing Yemenis seem to agree on: Saleh must go.

1:00pm

Sun August 7, 2011
NPR Story

Navy SEAL Community Handles Grief Quietly

Norfolk, Va., is in mourning Sunday, following the helicopter crash in Afghanistan that killed 30 U.S. troops — including almost two dozen Navy SEALs. Norfolk is home to many SEALs and their families. Guest host David Greene speaks with NPR's Daniel Zwerdling, who says this is a city that keeps grief close to the vest.

1:00pm

Sun August 7, 2011
NPR Story

Somalia: A Nation In Tatters

Parts of East Africa are suffering through the worst drought in 50 years. More than 10 million people in the area are in dire need of humanitarian aid. About 29,000 children under age 5 have died in the last three months. Somali refugees continue to flee to the Kenyan border, making the town of Dadaab host to the largest refugee camp in the world. Guest host David Greene speaks with Abdirahman Yabarow of Voice of America and Stephanie Savariaud of the United Nations World Food Program, who's working with the nearly half-million refugees in Dadaab.

1:00pm

Sun August 7, 2011
NPR Story

Downgrade A Result Of Washington's Dysfunction

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 4:24 am

When Standard & Poor's downgraded the United State's credit rating, it said that the "effectiveness, stability and predictability of American policymaking and political institutions have weakened." In other words, S&P was down on Washington's dysfunction, distrust and gridlock. The reactions to S&P's move — at least the reactions seen on TV — suggest that the ratings agency may have had a point.

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