Marketplace

Monday-Friday 3:00pm & 5:30pm
Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."

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Audio Archive

  • Thursday, July 10, 2014 3:46pm
    News that Chinese hackers broke into databases holding personal information on government employees is confirmation that your information is not safe, whether it be in a bank or a government vault. Now it’s all up to the private sector to protect our information, and that’s creating huge opportunities for data security businesses. Plus, Europe’s troubled economies are in deeper trouble still. Today’s bleak news? Portugal is possibly heading for another banking crisis while manufacturing numbers from France and Italy are simply disappointing. Deflation, contraction, recession. As Europe struggles on, we compare and contrast and ask about the impact, if any, on the U.S. Also, Boeing forecasts an even rosier future for airliner sales, spurred by economic growth in developing countries that it predicts will double the number of annual fliers in 20 years. Most growth will be in Asia. As developing countries become wealthier, the growth in air travel also shows how expanding transportation will add to global carbon emissions. We investigate.
  • Wednesday, July 9, 2014 3:19pm
    Citigroup is close to reaching a $7 billion settlement with the Department of Justice over allegations that it sold shoddy mortgages. The J.P. Morgan Chase settlement back in November was $13 billion, which raises the question: How does the Justice department come up with sich a number? Plus, Alcoa, a mega producer of aluminum, is trying to go the route that other founding U.S. corporations have gone by getting out of the commodity business it was built on and moving into more specialized products with less competition and higher profit margins. Also, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says employers are advertising more jobs. But that doesn’t mean they’re actually doing the hiring for those positions. 
  • Tuesday, July 8, 2014 3:28pm
    After a blaze of success that propelled it into going public, the Crumbs cupcake company is going out of business. We look at the object lessons that other one-product businesses might take from the Crumbs saga. Plus, a new report looks at grads who came out in the early days of the recession and concludes they’ve done just fine. They have, but only because they got in before things really hit the fan. We look behind the numbers. Also, seems Silicon Valley interns get paid a lot of money. Like, six grand a month, in some cases. What do they do to make that kind of cash, and why would any company want to pay an intern that much? We report.  
  • Monday, July 7, 2014 3:05pm
    Banks needing cash temporarily pawn off treasuries to get it – usually just for a day or two. The system is under strain because the Fed has bought so many bonds and also because regulations require many financial institutions to hold bonds as collateral for deals. This is causing deals to fail at unprecedented rates. Plus, Archer Daniels Midland, a major US food processor has agreed to buy a company called Wild Flavors, which specializes in natural flavorings for food products. We pull back the curtain on the business of flavor, and along the way find out about what’s in, what’s out, and the tastes that are trending. Also, some foods are at recent highs, others are cheaper than they’ve been, but overall, the USDA reports, Americans spend far less on food than people in most countries – an average of 6.6 percent of income. Even poor Americans don’t spend appreciably more of their income. We look at what makes food in the U.S. so inexpensive.
  • Friday, July 4, 2014 8:47am
    Ready to watch some fireworks this Independence Day? Even if they're banned in your neighborhood, you'll probably still see and hear a few. According to the American Pyrotechnics Association, most states have restrictions on large types of firework. So how come there are still so many things that go bang in the night? Youth Radio takes us into the black market of fireworks. And, July 4th is one of the top weekends for American beer brands. But as Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman reports shifting habits among beer drinkers may mean that won't be true for too much longer. Also, in the next installment of the series "I've always wondered", Golda Arthur looks into what it's like to be a day trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Playlist

March 25, 2013

5:56 PM
Almost a Year Since
Artist : Oddisee
Album : Odd Season
Composer :
Label : Mello Music Group

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5:19pm

Sat October 8, 2011
Occupy Denver

Occupy Denver Marches in the Rain

Jim Hill KUNC

Dismal weather and cold temperatures didn't slow the planned protest & march Saturday for Occupy Denver. The protestors gathered in Civic Center Park along Broadway until Noon, then marched across Lincoln to the west side steps of the Capitol building.

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2:21pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Whiteboard Video

Where do companies keep their cash?

Where do companies keep their cash? from Marketplace on Vimeo.

Companies are hoarding cash -- to cushion themselves if the economy worsens. But where do they keep all that money? Senior Editor Paddy Hirsch explains.

10:19am

Wed September 21, 2011
Whiteboard Video

Why Do European Banks Need Dollars?

Why do European banks need dollars? from Marketplace on Vimeo.

European banks need money. Specifically, they need dollars. But why? They have their own money, so why do they need ours? Marketplace Senior Editor Paddy Hirsch explains.

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8:17am

Thu September 15, 2011

10:45am

Tue September 13, 2011

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