Marketplace

Monday-Friday 3:00pm & 5:30pm
Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."

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Audio Archive

  • Tuesday, July 29, 2014 3:26pm
    A new round of European sanctions against Russia, announced today, may also hurt US businesses that operate in Russia or have interests there. We consider the possible impact on these firms. Plus, it's looking increasingly likely that Argentina will default on some of its bonds. So what happens then? Will Argentina be consumed by hellfire? Will fear of contagion freeze the global financial markets and plunge us into another recession? Or will it be business as usual in the global bond market? Also, according to a report by the Urban Institute that came out this week, around 77 million have debt in collections. We look at what happens when a bill goes to collection, and what happens to the people who owe money.
  • Monday, July 28, 2014 3:23pm
    Trulia and Zillow announced they will join forces in a deal worth a reported $3.5 billion. It looks a lot like something that happens in tech when a sector matures in which companies start buying each other open a so-called roll up. We explain why this happens and what to expect in this business. Plus, Dollar Tree will also be acquiring Family Dollar Stores in a deal valued at $8.5 billion. How have things changed and how are these stores repositioning themselves as the economy recovers? In Detroit, the city water agency is proceeding with its plan to go after individual residents who are delinquent, to scare people into paying up, while negotiating with or otherwise letting slip by the big delinquent users who can fight back. Like Chrysler. And the state of Michigan.
  • Friday, July 25, 2014 3:41pm
    We’ve come to expect lousy earnings reports from Amazon, but yesterday’s was beyond lousy, and the stock is  down 11 percent this morning. Has Amazon finally reached a point where it’s going to have to behave like other companies and make some money? Plus, under the Affordable Care Act, healthcare companies are required to spend at least 80 percent of premiums on actual medical care. We’ll explain how these rebates work and who actually gets the money. Also, has the automated red light camera system failed to live up to its promise? The system was created to improve safety on the roads and generate income in cities across the country, but the system has been plagued with controversy; and is increasingly unpopular with drivers. 
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 3:48pm
    Facebook’s blow-the-roof off earnings report shows that it has figured out mobile, and is set to dominate the mobile ad world. So how did that happen, and what comes next? Plus, in its latest earnings report, automaker GM has revealed that it expects to spend between $400 million and $600 million to compensate victims of its defective ignition switches. We consider the company’s strategy in handling its massive recall. Also, Twitter released its diversity statistics yesterday. Not surprisingly, they were as dismal as those at Google, Facebook and other tech companies. So now that they know the scope of the problem, what are these companies doing to address it?
  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 3:35pm
    Fighting between Israel and Hamas has led some U.S. and European airlines to cancel flights to Israel on safety grounds. We explore how airlines decide when they should or should not fly to a given destination. Plus, Target Corp. opened its first ‘TargetExpress’ store in Dinkytown, Minneapolis today. At 20,000 square feet it’s even smaller than its ‘City  Target’ stores. This physical reduction reflects an expansion by the company into new markets, but why has this big box corporation decided to ‘go small’? Is this part of a larger trend by big box stores to make their mark on smaller communities? Plus, how will this move impact the company’s profit margin? We investigate. Also, corporate earnings continue to go up, up, up. But that doesn’t mean these cash-rich companies are going to give you a job. We explain why.

Playlist

March 19, 2013

5:56 PM
Lace
Artist : Yan Saquet
Album : Salvatore Ferragamo
Composer :
Label : Yan Saquet Music Design

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6:00am

Sat March 17, 2012
Media

'This American Life' Pulls Apple Story

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, BYLINE: This weekend, the public radio program "This American Life" will air a retraction and apologize to listeners for a segment that aired in January about factories in China which make the Apple iPad. The story described hazardous working conditions at the plant. It was told by a man named Mike Daisey, who claimed to have interviewed workers injured there. Many elements of Daisey's story have now been discredited.

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12:21pm

Fri March 16, 2012
The Two-Way

'This American Life' Retracts Mike Daisey's Apple Factory Story

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 2:16 pm

Mike Daisey in a scene from "The Agony and The Ecstasy of Steve Jobs."
Stan Barouh AP

A highly popular episode of This American Life in which monologuist Mike Daisey tells of the abuses at factories that make Apple products in China contained "significant fabrications," the show said today.

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12:00am

Fri January 13, 2012
Whiteboard Video

Private Equity Explained

Private equity funds are groups of investors that flip companies for a profit. It’s the technique they use that makes them special, as senior producer Paddy Hirsch explains.

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11:47am

Thu January 5, 2012
Whiteboard Video

What is Re-hypothecation?

The term Re-hypothecation came up a lot during the MF Global meltdown. It’s quite a common term in the securities market – but what does it mean? Marketplace Money senior producer Paddy Hirsch explains.

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3:42pm

Fri December 16, 2011
Whiteboard Video

What is a junk bond?

Junk. Not a nice word. And when it comes to bonds, not a particularly accurate word, either. Junk is something useless, right? Something you want to toss in the trash? Well, “junk” bonds are definitely not useless. In fact they’re extremely useful. Sometimes. Marketplace Money Senior Producer Paddy Hirsch explains what a junk bond really is. 

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