Marketplace

Monday-Friday 3:00pm & 5:30pm
Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."

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Audio Archive

  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 3:35pm
    Fighting between Israel and Hamas has led some U.S. and European airlines to cancel flights to Israel on safety grounds. We explore how airlines decide when they should or should not fly to a given destination. Plus, Target Corp. opened its first ‘TargetExpress’ store in Dinkytown, Minneapolis today. At 20,000 square feet it’s even smaller than its ‘City  Target’ stores. This physical reduction reflects an expansion by the company into new markets, but why has this big box corporation decided to ‘go small’? Is this part of a larger trend by big box stores to make their mark on smaller communities? Plus, how will this move impact the company’s profit margin? We investigate. Also, corporate earnings continue to go up, up, up. But that doesn’t mean these cash-rich companies are going to give you a job. We explain why.
  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014 3:35pm
    Is inflation dead? Seems fair to say it’s at least comatose. The latest numbers show little movement in consumer prices and that’s unlikely to change soon. Plus, companies like  Comcast and Netflix are raking it in. So what are they doing with all that money? We investigate. Also, Boeing and Delta are in a massive fight right now over this esoteric thing called the Ex-Im bank and how much money ends up in Boeing’s hands. We explain what’s at the core of the fight and how it’s playing out in these two companies that once had a pretty symbiotic relationship.
  • Monday, July 21, 2014 3:25pm
    European leaders are angry with Russia and say President Vladimir Putin should do more to rein in the Russian separatists in Ukraine suspected of being involved in bringing down flight MH17. We examine what sanctions it would take to persuade Russia to change course. Plus, TSA security fees on airline tickets are about to go up. We explain the math behind your ticket. Also, Whirlpool is threatening to leave the EnergyStar program, unless Congress grants immunity from class-action lawsuits. How healthy, and vulnerable, is this label now?
  • Friday, July 18, 2014 3:09pm
    Ukraine told airlines to avoid parts of its airspace. MH17 did that, but was shot down anyway. We look at what happens when countries recommend the closure of flight lanes and how airlines handle the decision and where to fly. Also, It’s almost certain that the missile which downed MH-17 was a 70s-era Buk, or SA-11, a relic of the Cold War era that was Soviet-made, then sold off around the world via the international arms market, following the collapse of the USSR. We follow the long tail of the cold war weapons that point to the sky. And after, Twitter looks to expand the count on its user base beyond monthly users by changing its metrics to reflect tweets that are seen by people who are not logged in. Why?  More users more money 
  • Thursday, July 17, 2014 3:38pm
    Microsoft is laying off 14 percent of its staff, 18,000 employees. We look at how you manage a layoff process this big over that kind of time, and what effect it has on productivity and morale. Also, Amazon is preparing to launch an e-book subscription service, according to a page on its website. The service, called  “Kindle Unlimited” would apparently give subscribers access to 600,000 books at a monthly cost of $10. The monthly-subscription model works well with movies but how well will it work in the book world? We investigate? Also, housing starts were down in June, and way down in the South. But as with all monthly data reports, the question is, what does this mean? 

Playlist

March 26, 2013

5:56 PM
Pro Choice
Artist : Dujeous
Album : Day In Day Out
Composer :
Label : Dujeous

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6:00am

Sat March 17, 2012
Media

'This American Life' Pulls Apple Story

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, BYLINE: This weekend, the public radio program "This American Life" will air a retraction and apologize to listeners for a segment that aired in January about factories in China which make the Apple iPad. The story described hazardous working conditions at the plant. It was told by a man named Mike Daisey, who claimed to have interviewed workers injured there. Many elements of Daisey's story have now been discredited.

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12:21pm

Fri March 16, 2012
The Two-Way

'This American Life' Retracts Mike Daisey's Apple Factory Story

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 2:16 pm

Mike Daisey in a scene from "The Agony and The Ecstasy of Steve Jobs."
Stan Barouh AP

A highly popular episode of This American Life in which monologuist Mike Daisey tells of the abuses at factories that make Apple products in China contained "significant fabrications," the show said today.

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12:00am

Fri January 13, 2012
Whiteboard Video

Private Equity Explained

Private equity funds are groups of investors that flip companies for a profit. It’s the technique they use that makes them special, as senior producer Paddy Hirsch explains.

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11:47am

Thu January 5, 2012
Whiteboard Video

What is Re-hypothecation?

The term Re-hypothecation came up a lot during the MF Global meltdown. It’s quite a common term in the securities market – but what does it mean? Marketplace Money senior producer Paddy Hirsch explains.

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3:42pm

Fri December 16, 2011
Whiteboard Video

What is a junk bond?

Junk. Not a nice word. And when it comes to bonds, not a particularly accurate word, either. Junk is something useless, right? Something you want to toss in the trash? Well, “junk” bonds are definitely not useless. In fact they’re extremely useful. Sometimes. Marketplace Money Senior Producer Paddy Hirsch explains what a junk bond really is. 

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