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5:00am

Mon November 24, 2014
Life In A Boom Town

In The Bakken, The Self-Defense Business Is Good, But Is It Necessary?

Pepper sprays and blunt striking objects for women to hang on their key chains at a Damsel in Defense party in Dickinson, North Dakota.
Emily Guerin Inside Energy

On a recent Tuesday night in Dickinson, North Dakota, five women were sitting in the living room. It felt like a slumber party — no shoes, no husbands and no children — except these women were passing a stun gun back and forth. It's a purple stun gun with a rhinestone wrist strap.

Business is booming for Damsel in Defense, an Idaho-based company that throws home sales parties for self-defense products. In 2011, there were no sales reps in North Dakota. Now, there are about 30. Boom towns have never been friendly places for women.

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3:16am

Mon November 24, 2014
Back At Base

Combat Training: Can Female Marines Get The Job Done?

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 11:02 am

Katie Gorz (left) performs the ammo can lift next to male Marines as they go through the combat fitness test. The Marine Corps is experimenting with inserting some women into combat infantry roles that have historically been limited to men. At Camp Lejeune, female Marines are undergoing the same training as their male counterparts for combat arms.
Travis Dove for NPR

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base."

Lance Cpl. Jasmine Abrego is an office clerk who dreams of becoming a warrior.

She's flat on her stomach in the dirt, in full combat gear. Suddenly she pops up, slings a 44-pound metal tripod on her back and lurches forward in a crablike run. Finally, she slams the tripod to the ground. A male Marine slaps a .50-caliber machine gun into place.

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1:40am

Mon November 24, 2014
Shots - Health News

Upfront Costs Of Going Digital Overwhelm Some Doctors

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 3:07 pm

Dr. Oliver Korshin says he's just a few years from retirement and can't afford the flurry of technology upgrades the federal government expects him to make.
Annie Feidt Alaska Public Media

Dr. Oliver Korshin practices ophthalmology three days a week in the same small office in east Anchorage, Alaska, he's had for three decades. Many of his patients have aged into their Medicare years right along with him.

For his tiny practice, which employs just one part-time nurse, putting all his patients' medical records in an online database just doesn't make sense, Korshin says. It would cost too much to install and maintain — especially considering that he expects to retire in just a few years.

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1:38am

Mon November 24, 2014
Shots - Health News

Africa Inspires A Health Care Experiment In New York

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 3:09 pm

Norma Melendez, a community health worker with City Health Works, walks along Second Avenue on her way to meet a client. City Health Works is an organization that is attempting to bring an African model of health care delivery to the United States.
Bryan Thomas for NPR

There's a project in the neighborhood of Harlem in New York that has a through-the-looking-glass quality. An organization called City Health Works is trying to bring an African model of health care delivery to the United States. Usually it works the other way around.

If City Health Works' approach is successful, it could help change the way chronic diseases are managed in poverty-stricken communities, where people suffer disproportionately from HIV/AIDS, obesity and diabetes.

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6:14am

Fri November 21, 2014

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