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Erin OToole

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3:11am

Tue April 24, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:30 am

Weeks ahead of its initial public offering, Facebook released its first quarter profits Monday, and they are down 12 percent from a year ago. At the same time, company expenses have nearly doubled. Facebook attributes some of that to market expansion, which requires more employees and infrastructure.

1:27am

Tue April 24, 2012
Author Interviews

A Rival For Pigeon In Willems' New 'Duckling'

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 11:51 am

Author Mo Willems says the character of Pigeon first appeared in the margins of other projects, and demanded to be written about.
Marty Umans

For a certain set of readers, one need only say the word "pigeon" to set off a frenzied outburst of delight. Pigeon is the star of a series of best-selling children's books, including The Pigeon Finds a Hotdog! and Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! He's not much more than a stick figure with two circles for eyes, but he can still get huffy and display all the melodrama of a 4-year-old.

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12:16pm

Mon April 23, 2012
Environment

Colorado Schools Win Green Ribbon Awards

U.S. Department of Education

5:49am

Mon April 23, 2012
World

A Year After Tsunami, Japanese Ball Found In Alaska

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A precious piece of his childhood is going back to a teenager in Japan. Misaki Murakami and his family lost everything in last year's tsunami. But waves carried his soccer ball, covered in notes from third grade friends, to a beach in Alaska. David Baxter found it there and his Japanese wife translated the writing, including the teenager's name. It will be the first bit of North American tsunami debris officially returned to Japan. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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5:39am

Mon April 23, 2012

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