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THE morning news magazine. Join us weekday mornings as NPR's Morning Edition gives you news, analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. Stories are told through conversation as well as full reports. It's up-to-the-minute news that prepares listeners for the day ahead.

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5:16am

Tue August 30, 2011
Around the Nation

Police Officer Doesn't Buy Young 'Kidnappers' Story

In Mankato, Minnesota, a policeman encountered two young stepsisters out for a late-night walk with their goat. The girls said he lived in their bedroom closet. The officer discovered the stepsisters had seen the goat at the Sibley Park Zoo and decided to liberate it.

4:59am

Tue August 30, 2011
Around the Nation

Beyonce's Baby Announcement Holds Twitter Record

When there's big news, Twitter has a way to measure. They call it tweets per second or TPS for short. When Osama bin Laden was killed, Twitter hit 5,000 TPS. At the end of the U.S.-Japan Women's World Cup Final, the service clocked above 7,000 TPS. After Beyonce announced she was pregnant, Twitter ramped up to 8,868 TPS.

4:30am

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Polyester Strings Put More Spin On A Tennis Ball

Great tennis legends used to use heavy wooden rackets. Graphite arrived about 25 years ago. Since then, the technology hasn't change much. That is until now. More and more pros are using polyester strings in their rackets.

2:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

2:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Liyban Rebels Wary Of Sub-Saharan Africans

Now that Moammar Gadhafi's regime has lost control of the Libyan capital Tripoli, some Africans have been left vulnerable to attack. Many rebels believe any dark man from sub-Saharan Africa is a Gadhafi mercenary. The Africans say they are in Libya either as laborers or waiting to get to Italy. The International Organization for Migration says their plight is a significant problem.

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