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THE morning news magazine. Join us weekday mornings as NPR's Morning Edition gives you news, analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. Stories are told through conversation as well as full reports. It's up-to-the-minute news that prepares listeners for the day ahead.

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2:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Nominates Krueger As Top Economic Adviser

Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel of "The Wall Street Journal," about President Obama's choice of Alan Krueger as chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisors, and the president's jobs plan.

2:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

2:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Liyban Rebels Wary Of Sub-Saharan Africans

Now that Moammar Gadhafi's regime has lost control of the Libyan capital Tripoli, some Africans have been left vulnerable to attack. Many rebels believe any dark man from sub-Saharan Africa is a Gadhafi mercenary. The Africans say they are in Libya either as laborers or waiting to get to Italy. The International Organization for Migration says their plight is a significant problem.

2:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
Middle East

On Syrian-Sponsored Trip, Everyone Stays On Script

As the international community ratchets up criticism of Syria for its violent crackdown on anti-government protesters, the country is becoming more and more isolated. That means it's being forced to lean on allies like Russia and Iran. NPR's Kelly McEvers recently returned from a government-sponsored tour of Syria, mainly for reporters from countries that support regime.

10:01pm

Mon August 29, 2011
Crime In The City

Moscow, In A Time Of Fear

Remembering Russia's Dark Past: Tom Rob Smith's crime novels follow Soviet security agent Leo Demidov through 1950s Moscow, when Josef Stalin ruled the Kremlin and simply associating with the wrong people could land you in jail.
And all that Malarkey via Flickr

The novels of Tom Rob Smith are set mostly in the Soviet Union of the 1950s, a time and a place where oppression was palpable and any wrong move could get a person sent to a prison thousands of miles away.

Smith's first thriller, Child 44, was the story of a Soviet security agent whose job was to spy on fellow citizens. While many authors are virtual tour guides in the places where they set their novels, Smith had actually only been to Moscow once before — in 1997, on a high school trip.

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