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Erin OToole

THE morning news magazine. Join us weekday mornings as NPR's Morning Edition gives you news, analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. Stories are told through conversation as well as full reports. It's up-to-the-minute news that prepares listeners for the day ahead.

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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Law

When Did Companies Become People? Excavating The Legal Evolution

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 11:52 am

Volunteers at the Lincoln Memorial help roll up a giant banner printed with the Preamble to the Constitution during an October 2010 demonstration against the Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Are corporations people? The U.S. Supreme Court says they are, at least for some purposes. And in the past four years, the high court has dramatically expanded corporate rights.

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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Deceptive Cadence

The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 12:37 pm

Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein (who later became an American citizen) lost an arm in World War I. He commissioned composers including Maurice Ravel to write pieces for the left hand alone.
Bettmann/CORBIS

One hundred years ago today, the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia. The conflict drew in country after country and grew to an unprecedented scale. An estimated 9 million combatants lost their lives and more than 21 million were wounded in what came to be known as The Great War and, eventually, World War I.

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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Science

Shifts In Habitat May Threaten Ruddy Shorebird's Survival

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 10:01 am

Guided by biologists, volunteers briefly catch, band and release some of Delaware's visiting red knots each spring to monitor the health of the species.
Maggie Starbard NPR

An intrepid bird called the red knot migrates from the southern tip of South America to the Arctic and back every year. But changes in climate along its route are putting this ultramarathoner at risk.

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3:01pm

Fri July 25, 2014
Sports

At Jaguars' New Stadium, Come For The Football Or The Swimming

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 9:22 am

Hi, Mom! EverBank Field, home of the Jacksonville Jaguars, recently installed a massive video display. This artist's rendering previews the giant screen, which will be unveiled on Saturday.
Courtesy of the Jacksonville Jaguars

In Jacksonville, Fla., on Saturday, the Jaguars football team will unveil what it's calling the world's largest video display at a stadium. The team also has added luxury cabanas, where fans can watch the game poolside — improvements that are designed to get the beleaguered team's fans off their couches and into the stadium.

When team officials announced they were adding swimming pools to the stadium, some dismissed it as a gimmick. The Jacksonville Jaguars haven't been to the playoffs since 2007, and the team has been the butt of many a football joke.

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8:30am

Fri July 25, 2014
Movies

Formula Weighs The Latest Visit To The 'Planet Of The Apes'

Caesar, as played by Andy Serkis, in 'Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.'
Twentieth Century Fox

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is the latest incarnation of a movie franchise that’s been going for 46 years. Unfortunately, the situation hasn’t improved – people and apes are still going at it.

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