Morning Edition

Weekdays 4-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, David Greene
Erin OToole

THE morning news magazine. Join us weekday mornings as NPR's Morning Edition gives you news, analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. Stories are told through conversation as well as full reports. It's up-to-the-minute news that prepares listeners for the day ahead.

You can also get a taste of business, the economy, and the markets with the Marketplace Morning Report - every weekday at 5:50 and 7:50

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1:34am

Wed July 9, 2014
Sweetness And Light

A Golf Prodigy Grows Up, And Goes All The Way To The Top

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:31 am

American golfer Michelle Wie was a child prodigy. As an adult, she might just be the best female golfer in the world.
Tim Hales AP

Child actors are invariably distinguished by being cute as a button, being naturals at acting and having an aggressive parent. Few of them can sustain their stardom as they grow up. Athletic prodigies, however, often continue succeeding smoothly into adulthood — look no further than LeBron James or Bryce Harper.

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1:32am

Wed July 9, 2014
Shots - Health News

Like All Animals, We Need Stress. Just Not Too Much

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:09 am

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Ask somebody about stress, and you're likely to hear an outpouring about all the bad things that cause it — and the bad things that result. But if you ask a biologist, you'll hear that stress can be good.

In fact, it's essential.

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10:18am

Tue July 8, 2014
Movie Interviews

Richard Dreyfuss' Kids Revisit 'Jaws,' Conclude It Makes No Sense

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 1:59 pm

Robert Shaw (from left), Roy Scheider and Richard Dreyfuss play a shark hunter, a police chief and a marine biologist in 1975's Jaws.
Universal/Kobal Collection

6:17am

Tue July 8, 2014

3:01am

Tue July 8, 2014
Around the Nation

Obama To Ask Congress For $2B To Ease Immigration Crisis

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:51 am

Detainees sleep and watch television in a holding cell where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed at a U.S. Customs facility in Nogales, Texas.
Getty Images

The Obama administration will ask Congress for more than $2 billion Tuesday to address the urgent humanitarian crisis along the U.S. border with Mexico.

In the past nine months, more than 50,000 children and teenagers have crossed that border illegally on their own, most from Central America. By law, the administration can't deport those young people until they have an immigration hearing — a process that can take years.

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