Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

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9:44am

Sun October 19, 2014
Around the Nation

As Their Wells Run Dry, California Residents Blame Thirsty Farms

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Many rural California residents rely on private wells for tap water — wells that are starting to dry up.
Jeremy Raff KQED

Imagine flushing the toilet and watching sand come up. That's what happened to Pam Vieira, who lives south of Modesto, Calif. Her water well has slowed to a trickle, and you can see the sand in the tank of her toilet.

"Sometimes we have brown water," Vieira says. "Sometimes we have no water."

Vieira is one of as many as 2 million rural California residents who rely on private domestic wells for drinking water.

Some of those people are among the hardest hit by the state's severe drought, as wells across the state's Central Valley farm belt start to go dry.

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9:19am

Sun October 19, 2014
Parallels

An Urban Village Pops Up To Comfort Hong Kong Protesters

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Student demonstrators don't want to fall behind on their studies, so volunteers built them an outdoor study hall. Some of the desks are built into the concrete highway divider.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Hong Kong's main pro-democracy protest camp turned three-weeks-old over the weekend. What began as a road block has grown into urban village with several hundred tents that attracts more than a thousand people at night.

The camp is a combo street fair, outdoor art gallery with political sculptures, propaganda posters as well as speeches, movie screenings and even a free library.

The vibe here is like an American college campus in the 1960s, except it's on an island on the edge of the South China Sea and surrounded by skyscrapers.

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5:43am

Sun October 19, 2014
Sunday Puzzle

Time To Flex Those Math Muscles

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Sunday Puzzle
NPR

On-air challenge: This Tuesday, Oct. 21, would have been the 100th birthday of Martin Gardner, a longtime "Mathematical Games" columnist for Scientific American. He was also a well-known writer on recreational mathematics, puzzles, stage magic and debunking. Today's challenge consists of classic brainteasers from Martin Gardner books.

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5:43am

Sun October 19, 2014
Author Interviews

Chef Ottolenghi Makes The Case For 'Plenty More' Vegetables

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:46 am

Peas With Sorrel And Mustard
Jonathan Lovekin Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

When's the last time you cooked with sorrel leaves or nigella seeds? What about a marrow squash or verjuice? (Don't even know what a verjuice is? Neither did we — it's a special sauce made from semiripe wine grapes.)

All these ingredients might sound exotic and complicated, but chef Yotam Ottolenghi is here to convince you that you don't have to be a professional chef to use them. In his new book, Plenty More, Ottolenghi demonstrates how some off-the-beaten-path ingredients can turn your quotidian vegetable side dish into a thing of majesty.

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5:43am

Sun October 19, 2014
Around the Nation

The Kissimmee: A River Re-Curved

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 1:18 pm

The restoration's goal is to put as much of the Kissimmee as possible back to the way it was. This photo shows the river after restoration.
Courtesy the South Florida Water Management District

It sounds almost superhuman to try straighten a river and then recarve the curves.

That's what federal and state officials did to the Kissimmee River in Central Florida. They straightened the river in the 1960s into a canal to drain swampland and make way for the state's explosive growth. It worked — and it created an ecological disaster. So officials decided to restore the river's slow-flowing, meandering path.

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