Weekend Edition Sunday

  • Hosted by Rachel Martin
  • Local Host Karlie Huckels

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

One of the first steps to helping people out of homelessness is getting them a steady job. But what about the thousands of homeless Californians who are already working?

Pinning down exactly how many Californians are working while homeless is not easy. Many try to hide it. But recent estimates suggest that it's not uncommon.

On-air challenge: I'm going to give you some words and phrases. Each one conceals the name of a 5-letter country in left-to-right order, but not in consecutive letters. You name the country.

Example: CONCEPTUAL --> NEPAL
1. CHILDREN
2. VITALITY
3. ASPIRATION
4. SAMOVAR
5. CHAIN SAW
6. SUNDANCE
7. SYMMETRICAL
8. RIGHT-HAND MAN
9. PLAY IT BY EAR

Dennis Hof sits on a red and black velvet couch under TV screens that flash pictures of scantily clad women. Behind him, the doorbell is ringing and women in lingerie line up. Men walk in, select one of the women, sit with them at the bar and eventually head down a long hallway into bedrooms.

"We call it a meet and greet. So a customer comes up and the bell goes off and we let the girls know there's a new client in the house come out and meet him," he says, sipping on iced coffee and explaining the ways of his brothel.

During World War II, the British were worried about their own countrymen with Nazi sympathies.

That's the historical basis for Kate Atkinson's new novel, Transcription. It follows a character named Juliet Armstrong, who was recruited to the British Secret Service as a teenager to help monitor fascist sympathizers in 1940.

On-air challenge: I'm going to give you two 4-letter words. The first word can be found in consecutive letters inside the first name of a famous person (past or present). The second word can be found in consecutive letters inside that person's last name.

Example: POLE PART --> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE

1. WILL PEAR

2. AVID TERM

3. LIVE HARD

4. WINS HILL

5. ELSE LINT

6. THAN HORN

7. ROVE ELAN

Watching Nick Campbell now you wouldn't know what he's been through.

NPR first spoke to Campbell last year when he was 16, a high school student from a suburb of Las Vegas, just after the shooting. He was in a hospital bed, his right lung pierced by a bullet, his ribs broken.

On India's west coast, revelers hoist up statues of an elephant-headed god, and parade them toward the Arabian Sea. They sing and chant, and hand out food to bystanders.

For 10 days, they perform pooja — Hindu prayers — at the statues' feet and then submerge them in bodies of water.

This is a tradition in Mumbai, India's biggest city, near the end of each year's monsoon rains: a festival honoring Ganesh, or Lord Ganesha, the Hindu god of wisdom and good luck. He has a human body and an elephant head.

Toronto has been called the "raccoon capital of the world."

Sarah Smarsh grew up in rural Kansas — the fifth generation to farm the same land, riding tractors where her ancestors rode wagons. There was never enough money and prospects were few. She was part of the what has become popularized as the white working class. But back then, she didn't know it.

Adam Rippon has had a very busy year. The figure skating star has been snatching titles, ranging from U.S. figure skating national champion to Olympic bronze medalist.

As an openly gay athlete, Rippon has served as an inspiration and role model not only in the athletic world but also as an advocate and representative for the LGBTQ community.

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