Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fac|50e742a4e1c8e204c0dcca8a

Pages

5:40am

Sun September 30, 2012
What's in a Song?

'I've Been Everywhere' Turns 2 Hours Into 50 Years Of Pay

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 12:14 pm

iStockphoto.com

The song "I've Been Everywhere" was a hit for a string of country stars: Hank Snow in 1962, later Lynn Anderson, then Asleep at the Wheel and Johnny Cash. An all-American classic, right? Think again.

It was actually an Australian who, 50 years ago, wrote the song while trying to come up with a new opener for his act.

Read more

4:20am

Sun September 30, 2012
Author Interviews

The 'Future' Of Movies? Critic Says It's Not So Bright

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 6:04 am

iStockphoto.com

According to David Denby, 1979's Apocalypse Now came "out of a movie world so different from our own that sitting through it again is almost a masochistic experience."

The New Yorker film critic clearly loves movies, but in his new book, Do the Movies Have a Future?, he argues that complex films like Apocalypse Now are becoming more and more of a rarity. Denby joins NPR's Rachel Martin to discuss promising directors, what it means to be a film critic and the future of film.

Read more

4:19am

Sun September 30, 2012
Author Interviews

Inverting 'King Lear' In 'Goldberg Variations'

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 6:04 am

Scribner

Author Susan Isaacs has written 13 books; 12 of them have been best-sellers. The women who inhabit Isaacs' books are smart, sexy, a little snarky, and filled with some serious chutzpah.

The center of Isaacs' latest novel, Goldberg Variations, is no exception. Gloria Garrison owns a multimillion-dollar makeover business, and she is not exactly an easy lady to get along with.

Isaacs talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about writing strong women and growing up wanting to be a cowgirl.

Read more

4:04am

Sun September 30, 2012
Movies

'Looper' Director: Memory A Form Of Time Travel

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 6:04 am

Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt play different versions of the same character in the time-travel thriller Looper.
Alan Markfield Sony Pictures

Looper is a time traveling action flick set in the year 2044. Star Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays a paid assassin who makes the startling discovery that his next target is actually himself — an older version of himself from the future.

Read more
Tags: 

4:04am

Sun September 30, 2012
Music Interviews

Janis Martin, 'The Female Elvis,' Returns

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 7:28 am

A publicity photo of Janis Martin in the late 1950s or early '60s.
GAB Archive Redferns

Janis Martin was just a teenager from Virginia when she was christened "The Female Elvis." In the mid-1950s, she sold 750,000 copies of a song called "Will You, Willyum." She played the Grand Ole Opry, American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. But her fame was short-lived. Martin got married and had a baby, which didn't sit so well with the people managing her career. Her label dropped her, and she fell off the musical map.

Read more

Pages