Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

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9:15am

Sun September 21, 2014
Health Care

Which Catholics Offer Birth Control? Look To The Insurers

Originally published on Sun September 21, 2014 9:36 am

Sisters of the Servants of Mary from Kansas City, Kan., at a rally in 2012. Catholic employers don't want to offer insurance coverage for contraceptives, but Catholic insurance companies have quietly arranged for coverage for years.
John Hanna AP

The Affordable Care Act requires that most health plans offer birth control to women.

Around the country, Catholic employers have been arguing in court that having anything to do with insurance coverage of contraceptives violates their freedom of religion.

But when the insurance companies themselves are Catholic, contraceptive coverage comes without a hitch.

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8:29am

Sun September 21, 2014
Shots - Health News

Terminally Ill, But Constantly Hospitalized

Originally published on Mon September 22, 2014 6:12 am

Paula and Ron Faber walk their dog Millie in 2009, between cancer diagnoses.
Shelley Seccombe Shelley Seccombe

The place: Beth Israel Hospital in Manhattan.

The diagnosis: fast-growing, small-cell lung cancer.

The patient: Paula Faber, unrepentant, life-long smoker.

The choice: treat it aggressively to extend life, but probably not cure the disease, or manage the pain and focus on the quality of life.

It was September 2012 and it was Paula Faber's third cancer in a decade, but she did not hesitate.

"She was going to fight it every inch of the way," says her husband Ron Faber.

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6:06am

Sun September 21, 2014
Sunday Puzzle

Stuck In The Middle With Clues

Originally published on Sun September 21, 2014 9:15 am

NPR

On-air challenge: Given a five-letter word, insert two new letters between the second and third letters of the given word to complete a common seven-letter word. For example: Amble - Am(ia)ble.

Last week's challenge: This three-part challenge comes from listener Lou Gottlieb. If you punch 0-1-4-0 into a calculator, and turn it upside-down, you get the state OHIO. What numbers can you punch in a calculator, and turn upside-down, to get a state capital, a country and a country's capital?

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5:46am

Sun September 21, 2014
Book News & Features

Finding A Voice — Again — In The Pages Of A Comic Book

Originally published on Sun September 21, 2014 9:15 am

Recall and Given recasts the story of David Rector and Roz Alexander-Kasparik as a superhero comic.
Roz Alexander-Kasparik

This is a story about love. It's a story about bad things happening to good people, about memory and perseverance — and comic books. But most of all, it's a story about a voice. A mellow, smooth voice, just right for late-night jazz.

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5:46am

Sun September 21, 2014
Parallels

U.S., Iraqi Militias Join In Uneasy Alliance

Originally published on Sun September 21, 2014 9:15 am

Members of the Mehdi Army militia, which once fought U.S. forces in Iraq, take part in training in the southern Iraqi city of Basra on June 17. The militia's fighters now find themselves allied with the U.S. against the self-declared Islamic State.
AFP/Getty Images

In the Middle East, alliances have a strange way of shifting. And as the United States again becomes deeply involved in the conflict in Iraq, it's found itself making some strange alliances too.

Militias that used to fights American forces in Iraq are now fighting against the Islamic State — on the same side as the U.S. — and all sides involved have reservations about it.

A decade ago in Sadr City, a sprawling Shiite suburb of Baghdad, the Mehdi Army, led by Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, began to fight bitterly against American forces, calling them occupiers.

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