Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

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6:07am

Sun August 17, 2014
Music Interviews

More Than Just 'Somebody': Kimbra's New Groove

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 9:39 am

Kimbra will release The Golden Echo, the follow-up to her 2011 debut, Aug. 19.
Thom Kerr Courtesy of the artist

The woman who pops up halfway through "Somebody That I Used To Know," hijacking the 2011 hit to tell her own side of its fractured love story, has been busy since then. Kimbra's breakout turn singing alongside Gotye gave a pop-world boost to an eclectic career; on her latest album, The Golden Echo, she explores soul, funk, jazz and even disco.

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6:04am

Sun August 17, 2014
Sunday Puzzle

Is There An Echo In Here?

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 10:12 am

NPR

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made up of a two-word phrase, in which the second word has three syllables, and the first word sounds like the last two of these syllables. For example, given the clue, "What the Italians smell in their capital city," you would say, "Roma aroma."

Last week's challenge: Name a well-known movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of an animal plus the sound it makes. What animal is it?

Answer: Lamb (La Bamba)

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6:00am

Sun August 17, 2014
The Sunday Conversation

Kidnapped Russian Journalist: No One Is Paying Attention

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 9:39 am

Fatima Tlisova is an investigative reporter from Russia's North Caucasus region. During the 11 years she worked as a reporter there, she says she was repeatedly threatened and attacked.
BBG.gov

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Fatima Tlisova is an investigative reporter from Russia's North Caucasus region. During the 11 years she worked as a reporter there, she says, she was repeatedly threatened and attacked.

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6:00am

Sun August 17, 2014
Music Interviews

Smokey Robinson Sings The Hits, With A Few Good Friends

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 9:39 am

Smokey Robinson's new album of duets, Smokey & Friends, is out Aug. 19.
Courtesy of the artist

Smokey Robinson may know the formula to scripting the perfect love song. Over his 40-year career, he's has written thousands of songs — both for his own group The Miracles and for other legends of Motown, including Marvin Gaye, The Temptations and The Supremes.

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3:29am

Sun August 17, 2014
Shots - Health News

When Patients Read What Their Doctors Write

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:17 am

Katherine Streeter for NPR

The woman was sitting on a gurney in the emergency room, and I was facing her, typing. I had just written about her abdominal pain when she posed a question I'd never been asked before: "May I take a look at what you're writing?"

At the time, I was a fourth-year medical resident in Boston. In our ER, doctors routinely typed visit notes, placed orders and checked past records while we were in patients' rooms. To maintain at least some eye contact, we faced our patients, with the computer between us.

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