Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

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5:37am

Sun July 22, 2012
NPR Story

Candidates Battle For The Veterans' Vote

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 12:43 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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4:56am

Sun July 22, 2012
The Two-Way

'Who's On First?' The Sign Language Version

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 12:43 pm

A screen grab from the MLB video, "Costas and Seinfeld on Network."
MLB

Abbott and Costello's famous "Who's on First?" routine still stands as one of the greatest comedy sketches of all time. It was a feat of rapid-fire dialogue, flawless comedic timing and devastating wit.

But could you do it without saying a word?

The answer appears to be yes. After Jerry Seinfeld broke down the classic skit on the MLB Network recently, NPR's Mike Pesca wound up with a peculiar email in his inbox.

It was a link to an American Sign Language (ASL) version of the skit, sent by a friend. It was amazing, Pesca says.

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4:29am

Sun July 22, 2012
Election 2012

He's A Long Shot, But Don't Count Huckabee Out

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 9:08 am

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee delivers remarks to the Conservative Political Action Conference in February in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Among the many contenders who could wind up becoming presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney's running mate, there are some potential surprises — like former presidential candidate-turned TV and radio host Mike Huckabee.

Putting Huckabee on the GOP ticket could certainly liven up the presidential race. In addition to being a respected former governor of Arkansas, he's well known for his good-natured public persona. At a Huckabee campaign event, you might find him playing an electric bass with the old-time rock 'n' roll band Capitol Offense.

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4:21am

Sun July 22, 2012
Music News

Making A Home For John Coltrane's Legacy

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 5:12 pm

Last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation put the Coltrane Home on a list of the 11 most endangered historic sites in the United States. Now, a group of fans and family has set out to restore it.
Courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

In 1964, John Coltrane moved from Queens, N.Y., to a brick ranch house on a 31/2 acre wooded lot in the quiet suburb of Dix Hills. This bucolic setting — 40 miles east of the city — is perhaps the last place you'd expect to find a musician creating the virtuosic jazz that Coltrane is famous for.

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4:19am

Sun July 22, 2012
Author Interviews

New Edition Includes 39 Different Farewells To 'Arms'

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 12:43 pm

Sean Hemingway, grandson of the famous novelist, authored an introduction to the new edition of Ernest Hemingway's classic A Farewell to Arms.
Bruce Schwarz Simon and Schuster

Ernest Hemingway began his second novel, A Farewell to Arms, in 1928. He says, in an introduction to a later edition, that while he was writing the first draft his second son was born, and while he was rewriting the book, his father committed suicide. He goes on to say, with his famous economy, "I was not quite thirty years old when I finished the book and the day it was published was the day the stock market crashed."

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