Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fac|50e742a4e1c8e204c0dcca8a

Pages

10:03pm

Sat June 16, 2012
Theater

The Stage On Which Juliet First Called Out For Romeo

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 1:05 pm

Archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology recently excavated the site of the 16th-century Curtain Theatre, where Shakespeare staged some of his plays.
Museum of London Archaeology AP

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of the Bard's old stomping grounds — ruins of a famous 16th-century theater, buried below the streets of modern London. Known in its heyday as the Curtain Theatre, it's often been eclipsed by its more famous younger sibling, the Globe.

But the Curtain is a big deal in its own right. Some of Shakespeare's most famous works premiered there — Romeo and Juliet and Henry V, just to name a couple. NPR's Rachel Martin talked to the archaeologist who dug up the theater, Chris Thomas of the Museum of London.

Read more

2:03pm

Sat June 16, 2012
Music Interviews

One Father, Eight Sons, Nine Shiny Brass Bells

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 1:52 pm

The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble features eight of trumpeter Kelan Phil Cohran's sons.
Georgia Khun

Over the course of 85-year-old Kelan Phil Cohran's long career as an avant-garde jazz trumpeter, he's toured the world, performing with everyone from Sun Ra to Sarah Vaughan.

When not on the road, Cohran has worked as a music educator, teaching music in schools and prisons, and to his own children.

Read more

1:19pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Europe

An Olympic Task: Finding Good Food At The 2012 Games

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 5:43 pm

Vendors will serve 14 million meals during the Olympics, and critics are already panning the menu.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

When the 2012 Summer Olympics begin in July, a culinary starting gun will go off: Fourteen million meals will be prepared for spectators and athletes during the Olympic and Paralympic games in London.

The criticism is already pouring in.

Jacquelin Magnay, the Olympics editor at The Daily Telegraph wrote a recent article calling the food to be sold at Olympic venues "bland and over-priced." In response, an Olympic caterer sent her a custom bento box of gourmet delicacies.

Read more

5:27am

Sun June 10, 2012
World

India Keeping Close Eye on Neighboring Pakistan

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, let's turn to how the country sees its own neighbors, Afghanistan and India in particular. This past week, we asked people in the streets of Islamabad whether those two relationships, or the one with the United States is more important.

NISAR SHAH: (Through Translator) I think at this time the most important thing for Pakistan is to make peace with India and other countries in the region. Borders should be opened, economy should be strengthened, and we should get rid of arms race.

Read more
Tags: 

5:27am

Sun June 10, 2012
Europe

What's Next For Spain's Bailout Plan?

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Europeans woke up this morning with a couple of big fundamental questions looming over them. Have they saved Spain? And if not, is the eurozone heading for collapse? After weeks of denial, the Spanish government finally admitted what pretty much everyone else already knew: The country's banks need a bailout. The Spanish haven't said how much they need. But eurozone finance ministers had a long conference call yesterday and agreed they'd lend Spain up to $125 billion.

Read more

Pages