Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

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5:43am

Sun May 27, 2012
NPR Story

Children Act Out: Performing 'Deployment'

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Since 2001, more than 700,000 American children have had one or more parents deployed overseas by the military. Missed birthdays and other milestones become a part of life for military kids who are not always vocal about their feelings. In Grand Forks, N.D., a play called Deployed helped give some of them a voice. Meg Luther Lindholm reports.

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4:35am

Sun May 27, 2012
Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War

After A Year In Afghanistan, Memories That Stick

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 2:40 pm

Michael Currie was stationed in Afghanistan for the past year, leaving behind his wife and daughters. His most vivid memory of his service was the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

4:34am

Sun May 27, 2012
National Teachers Initiative

Hard Lessons Follow Rocky Start For Chicago Teacher

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 7:39 am

Tyrese Graham teaches science at John Marshall Metropolitan High School in Chicago.
StoryCorps

Tyrese Graham is a second-year science teacher at John Marshall Metropolitan High School on the West Side of Chicago. When he started teaching there, Marshall was among the worst public schools in the city.

When Graham walked into his first class, he could hardly speak over the noise of the students. He tried to make a point by not talking.

"I'll let you finish, but realize, every moment that I'm not talking and providing you instruction, you guys will be giving that back to me," he told them.

Graham's remarks were met with a sharp rebuke from one of his students.

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4:33am

Sun May 27, 2012
Music Interviews

Canadian Brass: Spiking The Recital With Humor

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

"Given that we were brass players when we started out, we had a very tall hill to climb just to get people interested in our music," says Canadian Brass founding member Chuck Daellenbach (center).
Bo Huang Courtesy of the artist

When the Canadian Brass came to NPR for a Tiny Desk Concert, the group kicked off the show with a piece its members say has been central to its repertoire for more than 40 years. It's a transcription of an organ work, Johann Sebastian Bach's "Little" Fugue in G Minor.

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4:33am

Sun May 27, 2012
Music Interviews

Deep In The Desert, Monks Make Transcendent Music

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

The monks of The Monastery of Christ in the Desert, on the grounds in Abiquiu, N.M.
Sergio Salvador Courtesy of the artist

If you drive about an hour and a half north of Santa Fe, N.M., into a place called the Chama Canyon, you might hear the clanging of church bells in the distance. The Monastery of Christ in the Desert was founded there in 1964 and is home to a community of Benedictine monks. They spend their days in prayer, work, meditation — and music.

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