9-11 Tenth Anniversary

4:06am

Sat September 10, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Tennessee Town Grapples With Sept. 11 Legacy

Hundreds of men pray at the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tenn. The congregation wants to build a new, bigger place to worship, but has faced stiff opposition from citizens who fear the local Muslims have a political agenda. Imam Ossama Bahloul says it's nonsense to think the congregation is a threat.
Debbie Elliott

In Murfreesboro, Tenn., more than 5,000 people are expected Sunday for the annual Sept. 11 memorial. What started as a small flag ceremony at the Rutherford County's Sheriff's Department 10 years ago is now a major community event. Murfreesboro has been dealing with another legacy of the attacks, which is playing out in a controversy over a mosque.

A Local Response To The Trauma

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4:03am

Sat September 10, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

With TSA, Are We Safer Or Sorry?

At the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, a small temporary exhibit marks Sept. 11, 2001. Along with artifacts found in the wreckage of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon — like a smashed firetruck door and twisted bits of fuselage — is a bin filled with every imaginable object people have tried to carry on airplanes.

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2:28pm

Fri September 9, 2011
The Two-Way

The Day Before America Was Interrupted: Nine People Recall Sept. 10, 2001

Rick King, who was assistant fire chief of Shanksville, Pa., on Sept. 11, 2001, stands near a cross made from steel from the World Trade Center, outside the fire station in Shanksville on July 14. He was one of nine people to tell NPR what Sept. 10 was like, the day before the horrible events of Sept. 11.
Gene J. Puskar AP

When Americans are asked what Sept. 10, 2001, was like, many call that Monday "normal" or "ordinary."

"Just a normal summer day," one man said.

That all changed on Sept. 11.

Nine individuals told All Things Considered where they were on Sept. 10. They talked about some of their serendipitous experiences, near misses or devastating turn of events of that day — the day before America was interrupted.

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1:19pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

In Afghanistan, Assessing A Rebel Leader's Legacy

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:26 am

Shown here in 1997, the "Lion of the Panjshir," Ahmad Shah Massoud (left), fought against the Soviets in the 1980s, was a central figure in the Afghan civil war of the '90s and led the resistance against the Taliban until his death on Sept. 9, 2001, the victim of al-Qaida suicide bombers.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Ten years ago Friday, a team of al-Qaida agents carried out an assassination that was the first step in their plan leading to the Sept. 11 attacks. In the north of Afghanistan, suicide bombers posing as journalists killed Ahmad Shah Massoud, the most famous leader of Afghan resistance against Taliban rule.

Today, posters of Massoud still adorn shops around northern Afghanistan, and admirers held a huge commemoration of him Friday near his home.

But 10 years after his death, Massoud's legacy has been overshadowed by a grueling war that grinds on with no end in sight.

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9:30am

Fri September 9, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Security Since Sept. 11: Worth The Cost?

A U.S. Capitol policeman performs a security sweep of the Capitol Dome and roof ahead of President Obama's speech to Congress on Thursday. The U.S. is spending more than $70 billion on homeland security this year, up from $20 billion a decade ago.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Is America safer today than it was a decade ago?

That question has been raised repeatedly in the discussions surrounding the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.

But authors John Mueller and Mark S. Stewart feel it's the wrong question. They pose a different one: are the vast increases in security spending justified by the threat of future attacks?

U.S. spending on homeland security and domestic intelligence has consumed nearly a half-trillion dollars over the past decade. It was just over $20 billion in 2001, this year it will top $72 billion.

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