Africa

3:02pm

Sun September 21, 2014
World

Ugandan LGBT Activist Recommended For Asylum In U.S.

Originally published on Sun September 21, 2014 6:31 pm

Ugandan gay-rights activist John Abdallah Wambere, right, embraces attorney Janson Wu, after announcing his application for asylum in May. The U.S. government has now formally recommended Wambere's application for approval.
Josh Reynolds AP

This past week, John Abdallah Wambere finally heard the seven words he had been waiting for:

"Your application has been recommended for approval."

Wambere, a prominent Ugandan LGBT-rights activist, had applied for asylum in the United States, due to anti-gay persecution in his home country.

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7:41am

Fri May 9, 2014
Science

Former Commando Turns Conservationist To Save Elephants Of Dzanga Bai

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 1:26 pm

Kalron and his team have set up video cameras that transmit real-time images of the bai via satellite.
Courtesy of Maisha Consulting

In the spring of 2013, poachers looking for elephant ivory took advantage of the chaos of a civil war raging in the Central African Republic, and massacred 26 rare forest elephants at a special place called the "Dzanga bai."

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7:50am

Sat April 26, 2014
The Salt

African Food With A Twist: Dakar Pop-Up Restaurant Raises The Bar

Magida Safaoui, right, and an assistant plate tomatoes at a Trio Toques event in April. Safaoui helps out the three chefs who run the restaurant.
Doreen Akiyo Yomoah for NPR

West Africa hasn't competed with the likes of Paris or Barcelona as a culinary destination, but a handful of food lovers there are making inroads to change that.

Visitors to Ghana can now sample the work of mixologists who specialize in liquors made with local ingredients. In Bamako, Mali, vinophiles can head to the annual Beaujolais Nouveau wine festival. And in Dakar, Senegal, there's Trio Toque.

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3:25pm

Tue April 8, 2014
Shots - Health News

The Ebola Outbreak 3 Weeks In: Dire But Not Hopeless

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:15 pm

The new normal in Guinea is washing hands with a mixture of water and bleach--shown here at the border entrance of Buruntuma, in the Gabu area on Tuesday.
Tiago Petinga EPA /LANDOV

Guinea is on high alert. At the international airport, travelers' temperatures are monitored for signs of infection. In the capital city of Conakry, people rarely shake hands and are advised to regularly wash their hands with bleach-diluted water.

This is what life is like nearly three weeks after an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus.

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2:28pm

Tue April 8, 2014
World

Remembering Rwandans Who Followed Their Conscience

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 3:10 pm

Godleaves Mukamunana, left, hid Domitil Mukakumuranga, in her house for weeks so that Hutu militias wouldn't kill her. "Seeing her alive is the best thing," Mukamunana says. "That kind of relationship we have is priceless. The fact that I don't have more like her --€” those who were killed — that's what's hurting."
Gregory Warner NPR

Olive Mukankusi lives in a two-room house with mud walls and a dirt floor in a village called Igati, in eastern Rwanda's Rwamagana province. To get there, you have to drive about 30 minutes down a dirt road.

It's there, in her home, on a warm and sunny afternoon, that she tells a story that she's only told three times in 20 years: first to a local judge, then to an American genocide researcher — and now.

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