Africa

4:29pm

Sun April 6, 2014
World

Fighting For Rwanda's Justice In France

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:00 pm

Rwandan genocide-hunter Dafroza Gauthier on February 4, 2014 at the opening of the trial of Pascal Simbikangwa, Rwanda's former intelligence chief, charged with complicity in the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
MARTIN BUREAU AFP/Getty Images

For more than a decade, Dafroza Gauthier and her husband, Alain, have hunted perpetrators of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. More than 800,000 people were killed in the genocide, most of them members of the Tutsi ethnic group.

Earlier this month, the couple gave testimony against former Rwandan intelligence chief Pascal Simbikangwa in Paris. On March 14, Simbikangwa was sentenced to 25 years in prison for complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity. His was the first Rwandan genocide trial to take place in France.

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10:42am

Sun April 6, 2014
World

Since Genocide, Rwanda's Women Have Helped Lead The Recovery

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

Rwanda is commemorating the 20-year anniversary of the genocide. Since that time, more women have entered politics to help with the recovery.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The Rwandan genocide left a deep and profound wound. It not only decimated the Rwandan people, it destroyed the nation's political and social structures.

In 1994, after the killing stopped, women made up 70 percent of the population.

They were needed to lead Rwanda's recovery. Rwandan women moved away from traditional roles and joined politics in unprecedented numbers.

Twenty years later, the Rwandan Parliament has more women than anywhere else in the world.

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9:46am

Sat April 5, 2014
Africa

'Hotel Rwanda' Manager: We've Failed To Learn From History

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 11:38 am

Paul Rusesabagina, who sheltered more than 1,000 people in his hotel during the Rwandan genocide, says the brutal violence in Syria, the Central African Republic and the Congo shows history repeats itself while people fail to learn from it.
Courtesy Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation

Paul Rusesabagina is a figure from history — a terrible history.

He was the manager of the Diplomat Hotel in Kigali, Rwanda, 20 years ago, when the genocide of Rwanda's Tutsi people began. More than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus would be killed in just three months.

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4:27pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Book Reviews

Dinaw Mengestu Embraces The Vastness Of Love And War

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:34 pm

Eli Meir Kaplan Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Why do love and war go so well together in novels? It isn't only because they're both naturally dramatic themes. Sometimes, in fact, each is so big and overwhelming that they can seem beyond the grasp of words. And so a writer who tries to show the struggle of two people with deep feelings for each other, "set against a backdrop of violence" (as a novel's flap copy might read), can just seem like he's overreaching. But Dinaw Mengestu uses love and war to powerfully explore a third, equally dramatic theme: identity.

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2:58pm

Wed April 2, 2014
Shots - Health News

Why Anthropologists Join An Ebola Outbreak Team

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 12:07 pm

Health specialists work in an isolation ward for patients in Guékedou, southern Guinea.
Seyllou AFP/Getty Images

When disease strikes in the developing world, like the current Ebola outbreak in Guinea, doctors, nurses and epidemiologists from international organizations fly in to help.

So do anthropologists.

Understanding local customs — and fears — can go a long way in getting communities to cooperate with international health care workers, says Barry Hewlett, a medical anthropologist at Washington State University.

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