Africa

4:28am

Sat August 25, 2012
Africa

Remembering Meles Zenawi, Ethiopia's Champion

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 6:35 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Ethiopia's longtime prime minister died this week. Meles Zenawi was 57. He came to power in 1991 when a rebel army toppled that nation's Marxist dictator and the Ethiopian leader became a trusted U.S. ally in the war against terrorism. As NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports, he leaves behind a mixed legacy.

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11:15am

Fri August 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Dire Health Conditions In South Sudan Prompt Airdrops

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 2:32 pm

Families wait for hours to register at the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan along the northern border in early July. Within a few weeks, the population of the camp more than doubled, leading to shortages of food, water and medicine.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

It's been only a year since South Sudan became an independent nation. But as NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reported last month, the young county is already facing major challenges.

One of these is a growing population of refugees at the northern border, where conditions have become so dire in the past few weeks that aid workers are now calling it a "health catastrophe."

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8:50am

Tue August 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Controverisal Ethiopian Leader Meles Zenawi Is Dead

Ethiopia announced the death of Prime Minister Meles Zenawi on Tuesday, August 21.
Khaled El-Fiqi AP

Ethiopia's longtime ruler, prime minister Meles Zenawi has died of an undisclosed illness. He was 57. Meles, as he is known, was a long-time ally of the U.S. and seen as a strong bulwark against terrorism.

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10:42am

Fri August 17, 2012
The Salt

Rwandan Coffee Farmers Turn Premium Beans Into Harvest Gold

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:04 am

Welcome to Rwanda's coffee land, where some of the world's best coffee is grown. Here, Minani Anastase, president of Musasa Coffee Cooperative in northern Rwanda, looks over the coffee drying tables.
Courtesy of Jonathan Kalan

Yesterday on All Things Considered, Allison Aubrey explained how coffee is the new wine — or, at least, how our morning brew is catching up with the evening Chardonnay in terms of our appreciation for its flavor and textures. And that's piquing our interest in learning where our coffee comes from.

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1:27am

Thu August 16, 2012
Africa

In South Sudan, Cows Are Cash And Source Of Friction

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 2:53 pm

A man from the Mundari nomad tribe stands among cattle on Jan. 18, in Juba, South Sudan. Cattle raids, a common occurrence in the region, have grown increasingly violent in recent years.
Kyodo/Landov

For the rural people of South Sudan, cattle are at the center of their culture. They use them as currency, treat them as objects of beauty, and fight tribal battles over them.

In recent years, traditional cattle raids have turned deadly. Tribesmen aren't just stealing cattle; they are slaughtering rivals, burning villages and abducting women and children.

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