Africa

6:03am

Sat April 28, 2012

4:03am

Sat April 28, 2012
Africa

In His Own Country, Charles Taylor Still Has Support

Originally published on Sat April 28, 2012 10:22 am

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor takes notes during his trial Thursday. He was found guilty of aiding war crimes in Sierra Leone.
AFP Getty Images

The guilty verdict against former Liberian President Charles Taylor, who was convicted of aiding and abetting war crimes in Sierra Leone this week, is sinking in across West Africa. The historic judgment of the first African president to be prosecuted in an international court leaves Taylor facing a lengthy sentence in a British prison.

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2:06pm

Thu April 26, 2012
Africa

At Last, Egypt Settles On Presidential Candidates

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 4:27 pm

Amr Moussa, the front-runner in the Egyptian presidential race, speaks during a press conference in Cairo on Apr. 22. The country's election commission said Thursday that Moussa and 12 other candidates are eligible to compete in next month's election.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

After months of anticipation, and just a few weeks before the voting, Egypt now has a list of 13 officially approved presidential candidates.

Amr Moussa, the former secretary-general of the Arab League, is one of the 13, and he is ahead in most opinion surveys in advance of the May 23-24 election.

And in a reversal, Egyptian election officials agreed Thursday to let one of Hosni Mubarak's former prime ministers run for president.

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6:13am

Thu April 26, 2012

3:09am

Thu April 26, 2012
The Two-Way

Liberia's Charles Taylor Facing Judgment In War Crimes Case

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 12:04 pm

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor, in court on Feb. 8, 2011.
Jerry Lampen AFP/Getty Images
  • NPR's Eric Westervelt reporting from The Hague

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor is guilty of "aiding and abetting" forces in Sierra Leone that committed war crimes and other atrocities during a war that lasted more than a decade and left more than 50,000 people dead, the Special Court for Sierra Leone ruled today.

Taylor, the first head of state since just after World War II to be judged by an international tribunal, "knew that his support" would assist and encourage fighters who were committing war crimes, the tribunal ruled. In return, he received so-called blood diamonds from Sierra Leone.

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