Al-Qaida (al Qaeda)

10:44am

Thu January 5, 2012
National Security

Sept. 11 Case A Litmus Test For Military Commissions

Originally published on Thu January 5, 2012 5:24 pm

In this photograph of a sketch by courtroom artist Janet Hamlin, reviewed by the U.S. military, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, a suspected plotter in the Sept. 11 attacks, attends his arraignment at the U.S. Military Commissions at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, in Cuba, on June 5, 2008. The trial for the five suspects is expected to begin sometime in the next few months.
Janet Hamlin AP

The long-awaited trial of five men accused of helping plan the Sept. 11 attacks is scheduled to begin early this year in a revamped trial process at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Initially, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other men charged with planning the attacks were going to be tried in a New York federal court, but congressional opposition forced the Obama administration to reverse course.

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12:07pm

Wed September 7, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Post-Sept. 11 Saudi Arabia Modernizing, Slowly

Standing amid the rubble, a man calls out to potential survivors after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001. Fifteen Saudis were among the hijackers who carried out the Sept. 11 attacks.
Doug Kanter AFP/Getty Images

Abdulaziz Al Rabah remembers it was a Tuesday. The call to evening prayer was echoing across his hometown of Hafr-al-Batin, Saudi Arabia, and bearded religious police had shooed him and his friends off the neighborhood soccer pitch.

"Have you seen what happened to America?" a wide-eyed friend asked the 13-year-old.

Racing home, Al Rabah joined his mother to watch the satellite television newscasts of America's agony unfolding on Sept. 11, 2001.

"I remember she was sad to see two guys jumping to the ground," he recalled.

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5:10pm

Mon July 18, 2011
Afghanistan

As Leadership Changes, So Could Afghanistan Strategy

Afghan National Army soldier Mohammed Shadwar gets a bird's-eye view from the rooftop of a mud-walled compound during a joint clearing operation in Helmand province, Afghanistan. As the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan changes, there's a question of whether U.S. policy will shift from one that supports building up Afghan national security forces to one focused on targeting insurgents.
David Gilkey NPR

Gen. David Petraeus stepped down as the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan on Monday and handed control of the war over to Marine Corps Gen. John Allen. Petraeus is leaving to become head of the CIA at the end of the summer.

A year ago, President Obama asked Petraeus to take charge in Afghanistan and jump start the counterinsurgency operation there. Now, there's a question of whether Monday's change in command also signals a change in strategy.

The Counterinsurgency Strategy

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12:01am

Tue May 31, 2011
Osama Bin Laden Killed

Al-Qaida's Paper Trail: A 'Treasure-Trove' For U.S.

When U.S. commandos stormed Osama bin Laden's compound earlier this month, they spent much of their time on the ground shoving papers, CDs and thumb drives into huge document bags strung around their necks. That sweep was considered an integral part of the operation, and it confirmed what the intelligence community had long believed: that bin Laden was obsessive about documenting everything.

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9:37pm

Sun May 1, 2011
The Two-Way

Osama Bin Laden Is Dead, Officials Say

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:55 am

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam in Quetta, Pakistan, rally to condemn the killing of Osama bin Laden on Monday.
Arshad Butt AP

Osama bin Laden, who created the al-Qaida terrorist network that killed 3,000 people in the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, is dead.

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