Allergies

1:25pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Shots - Health News

A Pill For Grass Allergies May Replace Shots For Some

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 1:47 pm

Could this be the end of grass and gesundheit?
iStockphoto

Later this spring, allergy sufferers will have access to a new form of help: a pill that can replace allergy shots. But the pill works only for grass allergies, and it's not clear how much it's going to cost.

The Food and Drug Administration just approved Oralair, the first sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for use in the United States. That's how regulators describe a pill that you stick under your tongue to tamp down your immune system.

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3:59pm

Thu September 26, 2013
The Salt

Doctors Say Changes In Wheat Do Not Explain Rise Of Celiac Disease

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 10:09 am

About 40 years ago wheat breeders introduced new varieties of wheat that helped farmers increase their grain yields. But scientists say those varieties aren't linked to the rise in celiac disease.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Wheat has been getting a bad rap lately.

Many folks are experimenting with the gluten-free diet, and a best-selling book called Wheat Belly has helped drive a lot of the interest.

"Wheat is the most destructive thing you could put on your plate, no question," says William Davis, a cardiologist in Milwaukee, Wis., who authored the book.

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9:11am

Fri August 2, 2013
The Salt

FDA Approves Gluten-Free Label

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 3:01 pm

The Food and Drug Administration issued Friday the first legally binding rules for what food companies can legally label "gluten-free."

The rules should help millions of Americans who can't tolerate gluten in their diet.

Gluten is a protein in wheat, barley and rye. Bakers appreciate its gluey texture for making bread. But when people with celiac disease eat it, it causes their immune systems to attack their small intestines.

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12:48pm

Mon July 1, 2013
The Salt

Experimental Treatment For Milk Allergy May Not Last

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 3:22 pm

Researchers are learning more about how to treat milk allergy by giving kids a small amount of milk protein, but it needs further study.
MICHAEL PROBST ASSOCIATED PRESS

One out of every 13 children has a food allergy, but the affliction still regularly stumps doctors. As Kari Nadeau, director of the Stanford Alliance for Food Allergy Research, told Terry Gross in April on Fresh Air, researchers still don't understand what "flips the switch between a food allergen versus a food nutrient in children."

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9:14am

Wed March 27, 2013
Shots - Health News

Allergy Drops Under The Tongue May Be Fine Alternative To Shots

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 11:31 am

Otolaryngologist Sandra Lin uses under-the-tongue drops to treat patients with allergies at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore.
Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine

Allergy shots have long been one of the best available treatments for hay fever, other allergies, and asthma, but they're a pain. In Europe, people have a more pleasant alternative: drops put under the tongue.

That treatment, called sublingual immunotherapy, hasn't been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but more and more patients in the U.S. are asking for it.

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