Animals/Wildlife

11:55am

Mon March 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Indonesian Zoo Breeds Rare Komodo Dragons

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 12:26 pm

Four of seven baby Komodos born at the Surabaya Zoo in Indonesia last week.
AFP/Getty Images

A zoo in Indonesia is now home to seven bouncing baby Komodo dragons. Before you recoil in disgust, have a look at this video from the BBC — "cute" may not be the operative word, but the hatchlings do exude a certain endearing quality.

Read more

4:56am

Fri March 15, 2013
The Picture Show

It's Called 'De-Extinction' — It's Like 'Jurassic Park,' Except It's Real

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:30 am

The bucardo, or Pyrenean ibex, lived high in the Pyrenees until its extinction in 2000. Three years later, researchers attempted to clone Celia, the last bucardo. The clone died minutes after birth. Taxidermic specimen, Regional Government of Aragon, Spain
Robb Kendrick National Geographic

Sorry to disappoint, but science writer Carl Zimmer says we're not going to bring back dinosaurs. But, he says, "science has developed to the point where we can actually talk seriously about possibly bringing back more recently extinct species."

It's called "de-extinction" — and it's Zimmer's cover story for National Geographic's April issue.

Read more

3:45am

Thu March 14, 2013
Strange News

Jack Russell Terrier Swallows More Than 100 Pennies

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 7:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Tim Kelleher says his Jack Russell terrier, Jack, scarfs down anything he can get his paws on. Which helps keep the kitchen floor clean, but last week Jack was looking very sick. Kelleher took him to the vet, who discovered the dog had consumed a bagel and somewhere along the line more than a hundred pennies. The vet operated and removed the pennies. Kelleher tells the New York Daily News that Jack's back and driving him crazy.

Read more

11:59am

Wed March 13, 2013
Europe

German Prince Plans To Put Bison Back In The Wild

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 3:17 pm

European bison, or wisents, keep a safe distance from human visitors to their enclosure on the property of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg in Germany's densely populated state of North Rhine-Westphalia.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

A small herd of European bison will soon be released in Germany's most densely populated state, the first time in nearly three centuries that these bison — known as wisents — will roam freely in Western Europe.

The project is the brainchild of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. He owns more than 30,000 acres, much of it covered in Norwegian spruce and beech trees in North Rhine-Westphalia.

For the 78-year-old logging magnate, the planned April release of the bull, five cows and two calves will fulfill a decade-old dream.

Read more

2:45pm

Tue March 12, 2013
Animals

Quick Brown Fox Can't Find Camouflaged Quail Eggs

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 11:57 pm

Researchers wanted to know if Japanese quail were aware of the colors and patterns on their eggs.
Courtesy of Lovell et al.

It's almost spring, and for many animals, warmer weather means it's time to find a mate. If you're a bird, finding that mate means a new clutch of eggs won't be far behind.

But keeping those eggs safe until they hatch can be a challenge, especially if you're a Japanese quail — a small ground-nesting bird that counts foxes among its predators.

The eggs of Coturnix japonica are tiny — not much bigger than a quarter. They're off-white or tan in color, with darker speckles.

Read more

Pages