Animals/Wildlife

7:15am

Wed February 27, 2013
Animals

PHOTO: Is That A Porcupine In A Tree?

Today we learned that porcupines are excellent tree climbers and spend most of their time up on the branches.
Credit Ann Hough, National Elk Refuge volunteer / USFWS

5:31am

Wed February 27, 2013
Animals

Runaway Bald Eagle Captured After 3 Days

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 5:39 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renée Montagne. Bald eagles are the definition of cool, but apparently they spook easily. So when Sequoia, a bald eagle at the Palo Alto Junior Museum and Zoo, got caught in a strong wind while spreading her wings at a local park, she took off to other suburbs. The San Jose Mercury News reports it took three days for the bald eagle's handlers to track her down. And then she was treated with a feast of mouse and quail. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

12:40pm

Fri February 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Aquarium Dumping Linked To Giant Tahoe Goldfish

You're going to need a bigger fishbowl.

Scientists searching for invasive species in Lake Tahoe scooped up a bright orange goldfish measuring nearly a foot and a half long and weighing more than 4 pounds, according to the website Live Science. (You can see it here.)

Environmental scientist Sudeep Chandra says a survey has uncovered a "nice corner" of the lake where about 15 other giant goldfish were living, apparently after being dumped there by aquarium owners.

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10:17am

Fri February 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Dead Mice Are Going To Be Dropped On Guam From Helicopters (Really)

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 1:38 pm

Orlando Getty Images

Here's the latest plan scientists have come up with to kill some of the estimated 2 million brown tree snakes that have wiped out many other animals on Guam:

In April or May they're going to lace dead mice with painkillers, attach them to little parachutes, drop them from helicopters and hope that they get snagged in the jungle foliage. Then, if all goes well, the snakes — which as their name implies hang out in trees — will eat the mice and die from ingesting the painkillers' active ingredients.

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1:27am

Fri February 22, 2013
Animals

Honey, It's Electric: Bees Sense Charge On Flowers

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 5:47 am

Adam Cole NPR

Flowers are nature's ad men. They'll do anything to attract the attention of the pollinators that help them reproduce. That means spending precious energy on bright pigments, enticing fragrances and dazzling patterns.

Now, scientists have found another element that contributes to flowers' brand: their distinct electric field.

Anne Leonard, who studies bees at the University of Nevada, says our understanding of pollinator-flower communication has been expanding for decades.

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