Animals/Wildlife

3:54pm

Wed May 9, 2012
Animals

'Frankenfish': It's What's For Dinner

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 5:19 pm

John Odenkirk holds up a snakehead. The fish can survive for long periods of time out of water as long as they're kept moist. They breathe air by gulping it, so they don't need to stay submerged.
Sabri Ben-Achour for NPR

More people on the East Coast are acquiring a taste for snakehead, an exotic fish that's moved here from Asia. But the fish are still multiplying and spreading.

Snakehead came to Maryland almost 10 years ago. The so-called "Frankenfish" looks like its namesake and has multiple rows of teeth. Someone released it here — and then there was a documentary and an unbelievably bad movie.

Creating A Market

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10:10am

Wed May 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Riveting Video Of Shy, Critically Endangered African Gorillas

The Cross River gorilla is one of the world's most endangered animals, with less than 300 of the apes remaining. They're hard for researchers to find, and at one point, the species was believed extinct until a few were spotted in the 1980s in their traditional habitat along the Cameroon-Nigeria border.

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6:12am

Tue May 8, 2012

2:23pm

Mon May 7, 2012
All Tech Considered

These Apps Are Going To The Birds, And People Who Watch Them

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 6:26 am

Cornell University's Andrew Farnsworth compiles data to forecast where birds are going and when they'll be there.
Margot Adler NPR

I'm standing in the Manhattan office of Andrew Farnsworth, a research associate at Cornell University's ornithology lab. Farnsworth is using meteorological data, radar data, crowd-sourced eBird data and acoustic data from the flight calls of migrating birds to predict where birds are going and when they'll be there.

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4:04am

Sun May 6, 2012
Animals

The Dinosaurs' Nemeses: Giant, Jurassic Fleas

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:38 am

An illustration of the Chinese Jurassic "pseudo-flea," which lived in the Middle Jurassic in northeastern China.
Wang Cheng Current Biology

Fossil-hunting scientists are coming to grips with a new discovery that could change forever how we think of dinosaurs. What they've found is that dinosaurs may well have been tortured by large, flealike bloodsucking insects.

Yes, it appears that the greatest predators that ever roamed Earth suffered just as we mammals did — and as we still do. Fleas were thought to have evolved along with mammals — they like our soft skins and a diet of warm blood.

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