Animals/Wildlife

12:15pm

Wed April 11, 2012
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Texting Guy Barely Escapes Bumping Into Bear

As the bear turned right, Vaz Terdandenyan was about to come down the sidewalk toward it. He got a surprise.
KTLA-TV

If this doesn't make you want to put down that cellphone, we don't know what will.

Watch what happened as Los Angeles TV station KTLA was tracking a black bear as it wandered through a neighborhood in La Crescenta, Calif., Tuesday morning.

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1:25am

Fri April 6, 2012
Around the Nation

Bears Stuffing Themselves Near Massachusetts Homes

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 5:33 pm

A black bear enjoys the landscaping of a Northampton, Mass., resident's yard. Northampton has been dealing with an unusual number of bears this year.
Courtesy of Alan Seewald

The mild New England winter means that more bears are up and about, looking for food — and not just in the woods. They're also exploring urban backyards and residential streets. The small town of Northampton, Mass., has more than its share of furry visitors.

In Northampton, a call on a neighborhood email list for tales of recent bear encounters netted about about a dozen responses in an hour. Almost everyone, it seems, has a bear story.

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1:39pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Animals

A 'Warm And Fuzzy' Dino? (Yes, But Mind The Teeth)

An artist's impression of a group of Yutyrannus. The 30-foot-long dinosaurs were covered with downy feathers — likely to keep the animals warm.
Dr. Brian Choo Nature

Thirty feet long and weighing in at around 3,000 pounds, Yutyrannus huali goes by the nickname "beautiful feathered tyrant." Yutyrannus earned the name "tyrant" because it casually ripped its prey to pieces. But it was also a snappy dresser: The huge predator was covered in downy feathers.

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1:01pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Animals

White-Nose Syndrome: A Scourge In The Bat Caves

A little brown bat with white-nose syndrome hangs in Greeley Mine, Vt., in March 2009. The disease is spreading across the country, currently affecting bat populations in 19 states.
Marvin Moriarty U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A disease that has killed more than 5.5 million bats in the eastern United States and Canada is making its way west. White-nose syndrome has now been diagnosed in three Missouri bats — the first confirmed cases west of the Mississippi. And scientists say it won't stop there.

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9:57am

Thu April 5, 2012
The Salt

Chocolate Bilbies, Not Bunnies, For An Australian Easter

The bilby is an endangered Australian marsupial that has been run out of its habitat by humans and rabbits.
Courtesy of Australia's Queensland State Government.

In the turf war between rabbits and bilbies that plays out in burrows dug into Australia's arid grasslands, rabbits, those aggressive and fertile European immigrants, have largely won out.

But the chocolate bilby has staked its claim on the springtime candy shelf — an honor that could help the threatened species make a real comeback.

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