Animals/Wildlife

1:16pm

Tue September 3, 2013
The Salt

Now A Test Can Tell If Your Pricey Cup Of Cat Poop Coffee Is Fake

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 11:25 am

A civet cat eats red coffee cherries at a farm in Bondowoso, Indonesia. Civets are actually more closely related to meerkats and mongooses than to cats.
Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images

From gross to gourmet. That pretty much sums up civet poop coffee.

The beans are literally harvested from the feces of the tree-dwelling civet cat in Indonesia. The idea is that a trip through the animal's digestive tract partially ferments the beans and imparts a much-sought-after flavor to the coffee.

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11:49am

Tue September 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Two Alligators Topping 720 Pounds Each Caught In Mississippi

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 4:24 pm

Beth Trammell of Madison, Miss., poses with the 723.5-pound alligator she and five others caught over the weekend.
Ricky Flynt Mississippi Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks Department

Two alligators, each weighing more than 720 pounds, were caught in Mississippi this past weekend, setting a new state record for heaviest male alligator. Both animals measured more than 13 feet in length; it took hours to get the trophies into the hunters' boats.

The huge reptiles were brought down on the same day, setting a state record that stood for less than two hours before it was broken again.

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3:15am

Tue September 3, 2013
Animals

The Latest In Scientific Field Equipment? Fido's Nose

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:25 pm

Rob Finch

Dave Vesely is busy training his dog, Sharpy. She isn't learning to sit or fetch or even herd sheep; Sharpy is learning to find the nests of western pond turtles.

These turtles are sneaky. After laying their eggs in a small hole, they knead together dirt, leaves and their own urine to plug the opening. Once this mud dries, the nest looks like an unremarkable patch of ground.

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5:08am

Fri August 30, 2013
Science

Wise Old Whooping Cranes Keep Captive-Bred Fledglings On Track

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 12:40 pm

This young whooping crane is on its first fall migration, guided by an Operation Migration ultralight aircraft. Each whooper in this population wears an identification band, and many carry tracking devices that record their movements in detail.
Joe Duff Operation Migration USA Inc.

Being a wildlife biologist in the 21st century increasingly means rescuing rare animals from extinction. Among the success stories is the whooping crane. Seventy years ago there were only about 16 birds left on the planet. Now there are about 600.

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5:45am

Tue August 27, 2013
Animals

Moose Population Healthier Than Ever in Colorado

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:11 am

Unlike other Western states, Colorado’s moose population is growing. It’s healthier than ever with an estimated 2300 moose across the state. While other states are grappling with why their herds are shrinking, Colorado is studying the population’s fast growth. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

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