Anthony Shadid

10:08am

Fri February 17, 2012
Remembrances

Fresh Air Remembers War Reporter Anthony Shadid

It is with great sadness that we report the sudden death of a frequent Fresh Air guest. New York Times foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid suffered a fatal asthma attack yesterday in Syria, where he was reporting on the political uprising.

Read more
Tags: 

5:05am

Fri February 17, 2012
Remembrances

Remembering 'Intrepid Storyteller' Anthony Shadid

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:01 am

New York Times journalist Anthony Shadid (second from right) reported from Embaba, a neighborhood in Cairo, in February 2011 during the revolution that toppled Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.
Ed Ou Getty Images

I met Anthony Shadid on a ruined airstrip in western Afghanistan in the winter of 2001-'02. He was sporting a beard and longer hair in those days that made him look a little like a crusading Arab warrior. We spoke briefly and exchanged a few bits of useful news about the place. As I recall his face now, I realize Anthony's secret: His sincerity was piercing, disarming and infectious.

Read more
Tags: 

9:40am

Wed December 21, 2011
Anti-Government Protests Roil Egypt

A Foreign Correspondent Reflects On The Arab Spring

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 10:55 am

Photographer Moises Saman captured this shot of two activists in Hama, Syria. Saman and journalist Anthony Shadid entered the city for several days last July. The rest of Saman's images can be found here.
Moises Saman The New York Times

Veteran war correspondent Anthony Shadid spent much of the past decade in Baghdad covering the Iraq war, first for The Washington Post and then for The New York Times. Last December, Shadid left Baghdad for his home in Beirut, Lebanon, where he's been based for more than a decade.

Read more

10:01pm

Tue September 6, 2011
Interviews

Baghdad College And America's Shifting Role In Iraq

Originally published on Wed September 7, 2011 1:57 pm

Students play a basketball game on the campus of Iraq's Baghdad College, in this undated photograph.
Ed Ou The New York Times

A school founded by Americans in Iraq before the Saddam Hussein era is an emblem of a time when the United States was known in the Middle East not for military action, but for culture and education. That's the view of Puliter Prize-winning New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid, who recently wrote an essay about the school, titled "The American Age, Iraq."

Read more

9:10am

Tue March 22, 2011
The Two-Way

'Shoot Them': Journalists Captured In Libya 'Thought It Was Over'

Originally published on Tue March 22, 2011 7:14 am

(Left to right) New York Times journalists Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks, Turkish ambassador Levent Sahinkaya, and Times journalists Lynsey Addario and Anthony Shadid, at the Turkish Embassy in Tripoli, Libya, on Monday. Turkish diplomats helped secure the journalists' release.
Anonymous AP

The four New York Times staffers who spent six days in the hands of fighters loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi tell their story today.

Among the frightening tales in the Times' account:

Read more