Arts & Life

3:42pm

Thu July 30, 2015
The Salt

Humans Aren't The Only Ones To Go Ape Over Diets: Chimps Detox, Too

Mineral supplements, ape-style: A female chimp called Kana eats clay in the Budongo Forest of Uganda.
A.Schel Budongo Conservation Field Station/Animal Ecology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Chimpanzees are like us in many ways. They can cook, they enjoy a good drink here and there, they share about 95 percent of our DNA.

Read more

1:29pm

Thu July 30, 2015
Shots - Health News

A Path From 'Blackout' Drunkenness To Sobriety And Self-Acceptance

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 4:00 pm

Sarah Hepola is the personal essays editor at Salon.com.
Zan Keith

Before Sarah Hepola got sober five years ago, she considered alcohol to be "the fuel of all adventure." These adventures included taking off her clothes in public, pouring beer on people's heads and waking up in strangers' beds. Frequently, Hepola didn't remember these incidents afterward because she had been in an alcohol-induced blackout.

Read more
Tags: 

12:39pm

Thu July 30, 2015
The Salt

Artists Transform Coffee Spills Into Masterpieces

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 8:18 pm

(Left) Afghan girl; (Right) Albert Einstein, by Maria Aristidou
Courtesy of Maria Aristidou

Ever splashed yourself with coffee or sat a dripping cup down on a white tablecloth? Then you're well aware of the beverage's staining powers. But where some see a ruined shirt, others have found a canvas.

For artist Maria Aristidou, it all started with a latte. "I was working on another commission using watercolors, when all the sudden, I spilled all over the drawing," she says.

Read more

5:03am

Thu July 30, 2015
The Salt

Do Fish Names Encourage Fishy Business?

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 7:41 pm

Sea bass, pollock, striped bass and other fish species are seen for sale at the Harbor Fish Market in Portland, Maine.
Ryan Kellman for NPR

Order a rockfish at a restaurant in Maryland, and you'll likely get a striped bass. Place the same order in California, and you could end up with a vermilion rockfish, a Pacific Ocean perch or one of dozens of other fish species on your plate.

This jumble of names is perfectly legal. But it's confusing to diners — and it can hamper efforts to combat illegal fishing and seafood fraud, says the ocean conservation group Oceana.

Read more

4:40pm

Wed July 29, 2015
Arts & Life

With 'Paper Towns,' Author John Green Reopens Search For Agloe, N.Y.

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 10:24 am

Booklist American Library Association

Agloe, N.Y., is a place suspended between fiction and reality.

The town started showing up on maps in the 1930s, but it's actually a "paper town," or a fake town created by cartographers to catch those who might copy their work. Mapmakers Otto G. Lindberg and Ernest Alpers came up with the name by rearranging their initials.

Read more
Tags: 

Pages