Arts & Life

4:13pm

Thu July 2, 2015
The Salt

White House: We Have A Beef With GMO Regulations

About 90 percent of America's soybeans are genetically modified.
iStockphoto

The U.S. government's system for regulating the products of biotechnology, including GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, was born in 1986, and it has been controversial from the start. Now, it will be getting a makeover — in part to assure the public that GMOs really are adequately regulated.

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1:16pm

Thu July 2, 2015
The Salt

Do Organic Farmers Need Special Seeds And Money To Breed Them?

"Who Gets Kissed" corn is a variety bred in Wisconsin specifically for organic farmers. It's named for an old game. At corn husking time, a lucky person who found a rare ear of corn with red kernels had the right to kiss anyone that he or she chose.
Courtesy of Adrienne Shelton

Rearranging veggie genes is big business, and we're not even talking about biotechnology. Private companies and university researchers spend hundreds of millions of dollars every year breeding better genetic varieties of food crops.

But organic farmers say those programs have a big blind spot when it comes to figuring out which new varieties are truly better. Few companies or researchers test those varieties under organic conditions.

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5:00am

Thu July 2, 2015
Arts & Life

A Scarcity Of Ballet Boys Means Big Breaks For Those Who Dance

Fifteen-year-old Patrick Koenigs practices during an all-boys class at the Colorado Ballet in Denver.
Stacy Nick KUNC

The world's most famous ballets all feature a handsome prince dancing alongside the beautiful ballerinas -  think Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, and, of course, The Nutcracker. At the training grounds for future dancers, it's more of a challenge these days to find the boys who will someday play those roles.

"Usually they only think of girls as taking ballet, like wearing dresses and stuff," said 8-year-old Finn Miller Vaughan, the only boy in a sea of pink tutus at Canyon Concert Ballet in Fort Collins. "They always think that… that it's weird and it's not that cool."

But the lack of boys interested in ballet has actually made the art form a very cool and a potentially career-making opportunity for those who do.

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4:34pm

Wed July 1, 2015
The Salt

A Dose Of Culinary Medicine Sends Med Students To The Kitchen

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 4:40 pm

University of Chicago medical student Manny Quaidoo adds a pinch of salt to the spinach feta frittata he's learning to cook as part of a culinary medicine class.
Monica Eng WBEZ

When it comes to premature death and disease, what we eat ranks as the single most important factor, according to a study in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association. Yet few doctors say they feel properly trained to dispense dietary advice. One group, at least, is trying to fill that knowledge gap.

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11:56am

Wed July 1, 2015
The Salt

The Scallop Scoop: Survey Forecasts A Banner Year In Atlantic

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 5:08 pm

NOAA scientists estimate they saw about 10 billion sea scallops off Delaware and southern New Jersey this spring as part of an annual survey.
Andrew Martinez Science Source

Scallop fishermen off the East Coast could soon see one of their biggest bumper crops ever. A federal survey in waters off Delaware is predicting a boom in the next couple of years for the nation's most valuable fishery.

Every year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration looks for young sea scallops on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. This year, when they stuck their camera in the water, they got a huge shock, says Dvora Hart, a research analyst with NOAA's Fisheries Service.

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