Arts & Life

3:39am

Sun May 26, 2013
NPR Story

'Brilliant Minds' Behind 'Mary Tyler Moore'

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:08 am

In the sixties, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly, and married. A couple shows even featured women who were sweetly supernatural - think Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy, and filled with joy. She was practically magic to a new generation of women.

The beloved Mary Tyler Moore Show went on the air in 1970, and now, more than 35 years later, it's still a source of inspiration.

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3:39am

Sun May 26, 2013
The Salt

Picnicking Through The Ages

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 1:56 pm

An illustration of noblemen enjoying a picnic, from a French edition of The Hunting Book of Gaston Phebus, 15th century.
Wikimedia Commons

Whether a shepherd, an explorer, a hunter or a fairgoer, people have been eating outside since the beginning of time.

"The dictionaries confirm the word 'picnic' first surfaced in the 18th century, so we were picnicking before we had the term," says research librarian and food historian Lynne Olver, who runs the Food Timeline website.

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4:37pm

Sat May 25, 2013
Author Interviews

A Literary Tale Of Chechnya, The Horror And Whimsy

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 10:05 am

Russian soldiers take their position near the village of Shatoy, Chechnya.
Alexander Nemenov AFP/Getty Images

In his debut novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, Anthony Marra transports readers to Chechnya, a war-torn Russian republic that has long sought independence.

The lyrical and heart-breaking novel begins in 2004 when a doctor watches as Russian soldiers abduct his neighbor, who has been accused of aiding Chechen rebels. He later rescues the neighbor's 8-year-old daughter, then colludes with another doctor to form an unlikely family amid the daily violence.

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4:15pm

Sat May 25, 2013
Books News & Features

A Lost And Found 'Wonder': Pearl S. Buck's Final Novel

Pearl Buck was born in West Virginia but spent much of her childhood in China, where her parents worked as missionaries.
Keystone Getty Images

Pearl S. Buck emerged into literary stardom in 1931 when she published a book called The Good Earth. That story of family life in a Chinese village won the novelist international acclaim, the Pulitzer and, eventually, a Nobel Prize. Her upbringing in China as the American daughter of missionaries served as inspiration for that novel and many others; by her death in 1973, Buck had written more than 100 books, including 43 novels.

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2:15pm

Sat May 25, 2013
The Spotlight

Hearing Voices: For the Fallen

Carl Wycoff Flickr - Creative Commons

For Memorial Day, the voices of veterans remembering their comrades.

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