Arts & Life

10:09am

Thu February 7, 2013
The Salt

Chain Restaurants Boost Sales With Lower-Calorie Foods

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:54 pm

Ordering the small fries? You're part of a trend.
iStockphoto.com

Lower-calorie foods are driving growth and profits for chain restaurants, according to fresh research, suggesting that people are making smarter choices when it comes to burgers and fries.

We're still ordering the burger and fries, mind you. But we're going for smaller portions and shunning sugary drinks. French fry sales dropped about 2 percent from 2006 to 2011, while sales of lower-calorie beverages rose 10 percent, the study found.

Read more

8:42am

Thu February 7, 2013
The Salt

Why Lebanese Love Their Raw Kibbeh

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 8:57 am

Kibbeh nayeh, a dish that combines raw meat, bulgur and onion, is "the definitive Lebanese festive food," says Kamal Mouzawak, founder of Beirut's first organic farmers market.
Maureen Abood

Growing up, I never knew I was eating raw meat. Or maybe it was just that I didn't think "raw" was something worth noting. I simply knew that kibbeh nayeh was incredibly good.

Read more

5:56am

Thu February 7, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Anne Of Green Gables Gets A Bad Makeover

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 6:59 am

The cover photo of an edition of Anne of Green Gables.
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • Anne of Green Gables, who is described in Lucy Maud Montgomery's best-selling books as red-headed, freckled and — at least when the Anne series begins — prepubescent, gets a horribly wrong makeover on the cover of this three-book set published in November.
Read more
Tags: 

1:26am

Thu February 7, 2013
Author Interviews

Raising A Glass To The Charms Of The Bar In 'Drinking With Men'

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 1:07 pm

iStockphoto.com

Rosie Schaap is a part-time bartender, and the author the "Drink" column for The New York Times Magazine. But she doesn't hang out in bars just to make a living — or even just to make a drink.

Read more

11:06am

Wed February 6, 2013
The Salt

Stone Age Stew? Soup Making May Be Older Than We'd Thought

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 2:36 pm

The tradition of making soup is probably at least 25,000 years old, says one archaeologist.
iStockphoto.com

Soup comes in many variations — chicken noodle, creamy tomato, potato and leek, to name a few. But through much of human history, soup was much simpler, requiring nothing more than boiling a haunch of meat or other chunk of food in water to create a warm, nourishing broth.

So who concocted that first bowl of soup?

Read more

Pages