Arts & Life

5:53pm

Tue December 4, 2012
U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree

Colorado Lawmakers Celebrate Lighting Of The US Capitol Christmas Tree

CSPAN Screenshot of the 2012 US Capital Christmas Tree lighting in Washington DC
CSPAN

Colorado Senators Mark Udall and Michael Bennet welcomed the lighting of the U.S. Capitol Christmas tree Tuesday evening. The 73-foot Englemann spruce came from Colorado's White River National Forest near Meeker.

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3:00pm

Tue December 4, 2012
The Two-Way

The First Book Printed In British North America And A Church's Decision To Sell It

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 9:34 am

Jeff Makholm holds the Bay Psalm Book.
Monica Brady-Myerov WBUR

This past Sunday, the Old South Church in Boston made a decision that cuts to the heart of not only the congregation's history, but to the very beginning of this country's founding.

With an overwhelming 271 to 34 vote, the church decided to give its board the power to sell one copy of the Bay Psalm Book, the first book ever printed in British North America.

Only 11 of the original 1,600 copies of the book printed in Cambridge in 1640 remain. And of those, the church owns two.

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1:13pm

Tue December 4, 2012
The Salt

A Hidden Hanukkah Tale Of A Woman, An Army And Some Killer Cheese

Originally published on Fri December 14, 2012 7:11 am

This Hanukkah lamp, made in Italy in the 19th century, depicts Judith holding a sword in one hand and the severed head of Holofernes in the other.
The Jewish Museum, New York / Art Resource, NY

At Hanukkah, many Jewish families celebrate with foods such as latkes and donuts that are fried in oil. The tradition honors the story of the miracle that occurred when a one-day supply of oil burned for eight days inside a temple under siege by the enemy .

Some Jews also eat dishes like kugel, cheesecake or rugelah that all share one ingredient — cheese. But how did cheese make it onto the holiday menu?

It starts (as many of these tales do) with a woman. This woman was Judith.

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10:33am

Tue December 4, 2012
The Salt

From Humors To Self Control: The Evolution Of A Well-Balanced Diet

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 1:11 pm

How a wealthy table set with a second course in the month of January would look, according to Mary Smith of Newcastle, in her 1772 book, The complete house-keeper and professed cook.
British Library

Chances are you're familiar with the phrase "a well-balanced diet." Two to three servings of meat, poultry or fish; three to five servings of vegetables — you know the drill. When we talk about being "well-balanced" today, we're usually talking about the specific nutrients we put into our body.

While this might seem like a relatively new development — a product of the past 50 years of fitness programs and diet regimes — as it turns out, this idea goes back much further.

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3:15pm

Mon December 3, 2012
The Salt

Can Big Food Kick Its Obesity Habit? Does It Really Want To?

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 11:11 am

A sign protesting a beverage tax in Richmond, Calif. The U.S. soft drink industry has fought proposals that would put a tax on sugar sweetened beverages like sodas and energy drinks.
Braden Reddall Reuters /Landov

A few days ago, two big names in food policy squared off for a formal debate on the following proposition: There is a fundamental and irreconcilable conflict between the food and beverage industry's interests and public health policy interests on obesity.

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