Arts & Life

3:16am

Mon November 26, 2012
The Salt

No Innocent Spice: The Secret Story Of Nutmeg, Life And Death

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 12:42 pm

This copper engraving from approximately 1700 depicts the condition of the English prisoners at the hands of the Dutch. In the 1660s, Cornell University's Eric Tagliacozzo says, the conflict and competition for the spice trade came to a head. "The Dutch decapitated a number of English merchants who were also in the Spice Islands trying to profit from the trade."
WikiCommons

Ah, nutmeg! Whether it's sprinkled on eggnog, baked into spice cake or blended into a latte, this pungent spice can evoke memories of holidays past. We tend to link it to celebratory times.

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2:50am

Mon November 26, 2012
Author Interviews

Memoir Traces How Cartoonist Lost Her 'Marbles'

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 7:45 am

iStockphoto.com

When you think of mental illness, you don't often think of comics; but for cartoonist Ellen Forney, the two came crashing together just before her 30th birthday. That's when she found out she has bipolar disorder, a diagnosis that finally explained her super-charged highs and debilitating lows.

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2:08pm

Sun November 25, 2012
Author Interviews

Uncovered Letters Reveal A New Side Of William Styron

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 3:00 pm

William Styron was one of the flamboyant literary figures of the 20th Century. He was a Southerner whose novel Lie Down in Darkness received immense acclaim when he was just 26 years old. He would go on to write the Confessions of Nat Turner, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1968.

But for the last 27 years of his life, Styron did not write a novel. He battled depression, and wrote a seminal work about it, Darkness Visible, in 1990.

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9:26am

Sun November 25, 2012
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

The Only Woman To Receive The Medal Of Honor

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 10:42 am

A portrait of Mary Walker from the National Archives.
Mathew Brady NARA

In all of American history, only one woman has been awarded the Medal of Honor — and Congress tried to take it back.

Her name was Mary Edwards Walker, and she was a doctor at a time when female physicians were rare. She graduated from the Syracuse Medical College, and at the outbreak of the Civil War traveled to Washington with the intention of joining the Army as a medical officer. When she was rejected, she volunteered as a surgeon and served in that capacity for various units through the war years, continually agitating for a commission.

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5:33am

Sun November 25, 2012
Author Interviews

'The Missing Ink' And The Intimacy Of Writing

When Philip Hensher realized he didn't know what his best friend's handwriting looked like, he decided to write a book. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Hensher about that book, The Missing Ink: The Lost Art of Handwriting.

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