Arts & Life

1:42am

Thu October 4, 2012
The Salt

Despite Greek Economy, Athens Cupcake Business Thrives

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:19 am

Nicole Kotovos arranges cupcakes in the case at her store in Athens.
Jim Zarroli NPR

Nicole Kotovos was searching for a way to start a new life when the idea struck her: She would go to her ancestral homeland of Greece and open an American-style bakery cafe. She would bring the cupcake fad to Athens.

What she didn't figure on was the historic downturn in the Greek economy.

The former New York TV producer arrived in 2008, just as the country's debt-mired economy was falling into a deep recession it still hasn't emerged from.

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3:40pm

Wed October 3, 2012
The Salt

Capturing Summer's Harvest, One DIY Wine Bottle At A Time

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 4:40 pm

Customers at a Hartford produce market, choosing grapes to turn into homemade wine.
Jeff Cohen NPR

If buying a local wine just isn't local enough for you, then you might consider joining the growing ranks of people making homemade wine this fall.

Some home winemakers make wine with friends for fun, some make wine with family for tradition; some make it "old school," adding nothing, and drink it by Christmas; others do it "new school," adding preservatives, and wait a year or more to bottle.

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2:56pm

Wed October 3, 2012
Theater

Racial Issues, Far From 'Invisible' On D.C. Stage

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 4:40 pm

Teagle F. Bougere plays the titular Invisible Man in The Studio Theatre's adaptation of Ralph Ellison's novel.
Astrid Riecken The Studio Theatre

On a farm in Waitsfield, Vt., in 1945, a Merchant Marine cook named Ralph Ellison was resting after his tour of duty.

"One morning scribbling, I wrote the first sentence of what later became The Invisible Man: 'I am an invisible man,' " Ellison recalled in an interview for National Educational Television.

He wrote that his protagonist — a Negro, as Ellison always put it — was young, powerless and ambitious for the role of leadership, a role at which he was doomed to fail.

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2:48pm

Wed October 3, 2012
Movies

'Flight': A Few Million Little Creatures That Could

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:19 am

"Supergenerations" of monarch butterflies migrate over 2000 miles from Canada to Mexico.
SK Films

A young boy in Canada wondered where butterflies go in the winter — and spent 40 years trying to answer that question.

In 1973, Dr. Fred Urquhart — all grown up by then — placed an ad in a newspaper in Mexico looking for volunteers to tag and observe butterflies and find their destination. A woman named Catalina Aguado and her American husband, Kenneth Brugger, answered that ad. They spent two years searching in remote parts of Mexico.

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10:03am

Wed October 3, 2012
The Salt

Freshwater Shrimp: Still Not A Midwestern Cash Crop

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 4:07 pm

A patron enjoys the offerings at this year's Ohio Fish and Shrimp Festival.
Maureen Langlois NPR

It's harvest time in the heartland, but not just for apples and squash. In small, back-lot ponds on farms across the Midwest, a different crop has been growing all summer. They're substantial, slightly sweet and a revelation to the land-locked palate, not to mention worth top dollar. Yep, it's shrimp season in Ohio.

But don't ask for any Midwestern shrimp at your local fishmonger. There aren't enough yet to make it to the store.

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