Arts & Life

2:50pm

Fri September 28, 2012
NewsPoet: Writing The Day In Verse

NewsPoet: Philip Schultz Writes The Day In Verse

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 5:24 pm

Philip Schultz visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Monday.
Ryan Smith NPR

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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10:38am

Fri September 28, 2012
The Salt

Grieving Pet Owners Want Imported Dog Treats Pulled From Shelves

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 2:52 pm

Rita Desollar believes chicken jerky treats imported from China killed her German shepherd, Heidi.
Rita Desollar

The Food and Drug Administration isn't sure, but Rita Desollar of Pekin, Ill., feels she knows what killed Heidi, her 7-year-old German shepherd. She feels it was the chicken jerky strips she bought at her local Walgreen's.

Desollar says on the Wednesday before Memorial Day, she gave two pieces of Waggin' Train jerky to Heidi as a treat. A few days later, Heidi was throwing up and "in a lot of distress," she says. By the time the holiday rolled around on Monday, Desollar says, Heidi was convulsing in her bed. She died that day, before Desollar could even take her to the vet.

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8:08am

Fri September 28, 2012
The Salt

Some Grumble About Change As School Lunches Get Leaner And Greener

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 11:16 am

Michelle Kloser, School Nutrition Director for the West Salem School District in Wisconsin took this picture of Thursday's lunch, which includes baked chicken and rosemary potatoes.
Michelle Kloser for NPR

1:30am

Fri September 28, 2012
Books

Put Down Your E-Reader: This Book's Better In Print

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 9:28 am

"For two days and nights, Odysseus was alone in the wild water. The sea was so rough that he couldn't see beyond the nearest wave. Over and over again, he thought he was going to die."
Neil Packer Candlewick Press

Most people who read a lot have gotten used to reading on a screen, whether it's a laptop, a tablet or an e-reader. Some say they prefer it to the experience of reading a heavy, awkward print version of the book. But every now and then, a book comes along that just seems to insist on being physical — something about it simply can't be transferred to the screen.

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1:28am

Fri September 28, 2012
StoryCorps

Finding Health After Letting Go Of Hate

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 10:49 am

Charlie Morris, 91, says he was at school in 1939 when he found out his brother was dead. For 10 years, his hatred consumed him and plagued his body with mysterious ailments. "When I began to forgive, there was all the answers to my illness," he says.
StoryCorps

In 1939, Jessie Lee Bond died. His death certificate says he drowned accidentally, but his family has always maintained that he was lynched after an argument with white shop owners — shot and thrown into the river.

No one has ever been charged with his death.

Decades later, his now-91-year-old brother, Charlie Morris, told StoryCorps in Memphis, Tenn., that he was at school when he was called down to the office and told that his brother had been murdered.

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