Arts & Life

1:38pm

Mon March 5, 2012
The Salt

Sustainable Sushi: See The Video. But Don't Eat The Eel

Odds are the local sushi joint's fish is less than sustainable.
Matteo De Stefano IStockPhoto.com

Sushi seems like the perfect modern food: Light, healthful and available at seemingly every supermarket in the nation. But is it sustainable?

That's the question behind "The Story of Sushi," a new video that's been pulling a lot of clicks in the past week. Maybe that's because its adorable format, with tiny, handcrafted figures used to tell the tale, stands in stark contrast to its depressing message: Most of the sushi we snarf up is harvested using unsustainable methods.

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10:33am

Mon March 5, 2012
The Salt

Raw Milk Proponents Don't Trust Health Officials

Raw milk lovers trust the stuff that comes straight from the cow more than they trust the FDA.
iStockPhoto.com

You'd think that scary numbers from the big dogs in infectious disease would be enough to make raw milk drinkers reconsider that choice.

But don't count on it. Just 7 percent of raw milk consumers say they trust health officials' recommendations on what foods are safe to eat, according to a new study.

That means that 93 percent of those folks aren't convinced when health officials say that raw milk products can cause diseases like bovine tuberculosis, Q-fever, and brucellosis, as well as more common food-borne illnesses like Listeria and Salmonella.

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9:03am

Mon March 5, 2012
Media

4 Survival Strategies For Struggling Newspapers

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 10:42 am

A new study suggests ways newspapers can survive in the digital world. Here dead-tree versions of front pages from around the country announce the death of Osama bin Laden in front of the Newseum in Washington on May 2, 2011.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

Newspapers are dying, right?

You probably think so because, for one thing, you're not reading this in a newspaper.

It'd be a reasonable thought. Newspaper readers gradually have been stopping their subscriptions for many years. And the Internet (NPR.org, too) has steadily stolen readers and advertising revenue for the past decade.

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2:43pm

Sun March 4, 2012
Author Interviews

They're Nobody And Want To Know Everything

Two mysterious men pull up to the courthouse and head to the public records office. They're strangers, and they ask a lot of strange questions like, "I'd like to look at Mayor John Doe's property deeds." Or, "I want to see Congressman Smith's voting records."

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12:25pm

Sun March 4, 2012
Author Interviews

A Road Trip In Search Of America's Lost Languages

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 11:38 am

Trip of the Tongue cover detail
Bloomsbury Publishing

The vast majority of the 175 indigenous languages still spoken in the United States are on the verge of extinction.

Linguist Elizabeth Little spent two years driving all over the country looking for the few remaining pockets where those languages are still spoken — from the scores of Native American tongues, to the Creole of Louisiana. The resulting book is Trip of the Tongue: Cross-Country Travels in Search of America's Lost Languages.

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