Arts & Life

3:46pm

Tue February 7, 2012
Opinion

Cabaret Wanes As The Oak Room Is Felled

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 5:13 pm

American comedy duo Jerry Lewis (left) and Dean Martin (right) with the English playwright and actor Noel Coward at an unknown location in 1953. Lewis and Martin were famous for their cabaret acts in the 1940s and 1950s.
R. Mitchell Getty Images

One of New York City's most famous cabaret clubs, the Oak Room at the Algonquin Hotel, is closing. At least one person will feel the loss — Murray Horwitz, the author of two Broadway musicals and numerous cabaret acts.

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1:42pm

Tue February 7, 2012
Religion

A Pulpit For The Masses: YouTube, Christians Click

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 4:26 pm

Created by liberal Christians, the YouTube video "Tea Party Jesus" is a spoof on conservative politics.
AmericanValuesNet/YouTube

12:55pm

Tue February 7, 2012
The Two-Way

Flipping 'The Bird' Just Isn't Obscene Anymore, Law Professor Argues

M.I.A.'s now famous finger during halftime of the Super Bowl.
Christopher Polk Getty Images
(Note: This is a post about obscenity. Proceed with caution if the subject bothers you.)

We've got one more thing to say about "the bird" and singer M.I.A.'s flipping of her middle finger on national TV during Sunday's halftime show at the Super Bowl.

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9:07am

Tue February 7, 2012
Books

Dickens At 200: A Birthday You Can't 'Bah Humbug'

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 10:01 pm

Born in 1812, English writer Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago on Feb. 7.
Rischgitz Getty Images

Tuesday marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Dickens — the great 19th century English novelist who gave us stories of pathos and comedy, and colorful portraits of the people of London, from the poor in the back streets, to the rich in the parks and avenues.

Lots of Dickens' phrases — like "Bah humbug" and "God bless us, every one!" — have slipped into our minds and our memories. And along with the words, the characters, too — from hungry orphan Oliver Twist to Little Dorrit to cruel Mr. Murdstone.

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4:03am

Tue February 7, 2012
Author Interviews

Mumbai Slum Exists 'Behind The Beautiful Forevers'

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 8:29 am

Katherine Boo won a Pulitzer Prize for her reporting on abuse and neglect in group homes. A staff writer for The New Yorker, she is also the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.
Heleen Welvaart

Next to Mumbai's bustling international airport, a boy picks through refuse, looking for pieces he can recycle and sell to support his family of 11. He is a resident of Annawadi, a slum built on a patch of reclaimed swampland — now fringed by luxury hotels.

As economists and activists fret over increasing income inequality in America, scenes like this one from journalist Katherine Boo's new book, Behind the Beautiful Forevers, are a forceful reminder of the extreme disparity of wealth that exist all over the world — and what people must do to survive.

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