Arts & Life

6:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Movies

Checking In On The Sundance Film Festival

Host Rachel Martin speaks with entertainment reporter Stacey Wilson about this year's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

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4:33am

Sun January 22, 2012
Books

'Cultural Revolution Cookbook': A Taste Of Humanity

Braised Pork In Soy
Melisa Goh NPR

From about 1966 to 1976, China's leader Mao Zedong enforced a brutal agenda. Everything was rationed during the Cultural Revolution. Millions of people were forced out of the cities and into the countryside, where food was even scarcer. The government controlled people's movements, their livelihoods, even their thoughts.

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6:00am

Sat January 21, 2012
The Salt

How One Former Vegan Learned To Embrace Butchering

Butcher-in-training Andrew Plotsky at the 2011 Young Farmers Conference.
Maggie Starbard NPR

The farm-to-table philosophy has been mostly about knowing where food was grown. For meat, that meant knowing if your chickens were caged and if your beef was grass fed.

But with the revival of the butcher shop, some young people are undertaking the largely lost art of butchering as a stronger way to connect with their food.

For 24-year-old Andrew Plotsky of Washington, D.C., that meant leaving his job as a barista in a snobby coffee shop to learn the process of raising an animal, slaughtering it and butchering it for a meal.

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4:01am

Sat January 21, 2012
Author Interviews

Lesson Learned: Don't Fly To North Pole In A Balloon

Knopf

In the late 19th century, scores of celebrated, valorous explorers attempted to reach the North Pole. Groups of explorers from the U.S., Europe and Scandinavia invented clever new equipment, raised money, stirred national pride and enthralled the world by attempting to march, sail or sled to the most cold, remote and unseen place on Earth.

But it was a perilous business: Of the 1,000 people who tried to reach the North Pole in the late 1800s, 751 died during their attempt, author Alec Wilkinson tells NPR's Scott Simon.

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11:25am

Fri January 20, 2012
The Two-Way

Not A Record, But Audubon Set Still Sells For A Tidy $7.9 Million

We wouldn't want to say that $7,922,500 isn't an awful lot to pay for one set of four books.

But we do have to point out that it's not a record.

Thursday, we previewed the Christie's New York auction of a rare set of John James Audubon's Birds of America. As we reported, there was talk that it might fetch more than the record $11.5 million paid for another full set of the books in 2010.

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