Arts & Life

7:35am

Sun May 1, 2011
Fine Art

Ai Weiwei's Artwork Travels, Despite Detainment

On Monday, 12 large sculptures by Chinese artist Ai Weiwei will be unveiled in New York, but the whereabouts of their creator remain unknown.

Ai was taken into custody by Chinese authorities nearly a month ago and, according to his family, the government still has not told them where he is or why he was taken.

Ai has always been outspoken in both his art and his life, but recent events in China and the Middle East have brought greater government scrutiny to one of the country's best known artists.

A Visit With Ai Weiwei

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8:10am

Thu April 21, 2011
The Two-Way

Wael Ghonim Tops 'Time' Magazine's Latest 100 Most Influential People List

He became for many the face of the protesters in Cairo back in February.

Now, Google executive Wael Ghonim is on the "2011 Time 100" — the magazine's latest list of the most influential people in the world.

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3:07pm

Mon April 18, 2011
Religion

King James Bible, Now 400, Still Echoes 'Voice of God'

This year, the most influential book you may never have read is celebrating a major birthday. The King James Version of the Bible was published 400 years ago. It's no longer the top-selling Bible, but in those four centuries, it has woven itself deeply into our speech and culture.

Let's travel back to 1603: King James I, who had ruled Scotland, ascended to the throne of England. What he found was a country suspicious of the new king.

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11:26am

Sat April 16, 2011
The Two-Way

Art And Consequence: A Talk With China's Controversial Ai Weiwei

This Sunday, at Chinese embassies all over world, protesters are planning a global sit-in to protest the detention of the internationally renowned Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Ai was taken into custody by Chinese authorities nearly two weeks ago for what government officials now say are questions about his finances.

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5:14am

Wed April 13, 2011
Kitchen Window

A Passover Recipe As Easy As Matzo Pie

Originally published on Wed April 13, 2011 6:43 am

Alex Trimble for NPR

Toward the opening of the Passover Seder, participants point to the matzo on the table, and announce: "This is the bread of affliction that our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat. Let all who are needy come and celebrate Passover." It's a lovely sentiment, remembering the struggles of previous generations of Jews, and opening your home to all those who suffer to this day. But bread of affliction? No more.

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