Author Interviews

3:02pm

Sun September 29, 2013
Author Interviews

How Two Brothers Waged A 'Secret World War' In The 1950s

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 4:30 pm

Courtesy of Times Books

John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles were the forefathers of using covert operations to upset foreign governments — with the aim of overthrow.

They learned the reach of American power abroad when they were partners at an influential New York law firm. Later, with John Foster Dulles serving as secretary of state and Allen Dulles as CIA chief, they shared power in the President Dwight Eisenhower's administration.

Read more

4:31pm

Sat September 28, 2013
Author Interviews

'Faithful Scribe': Tracing Ancestry Through Pakistan's History

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 5:10 pm

The Faithful Scribe, by Shahan Mufti

In The Faithful Scribe, Shahan Mufti examines the history of Pakistan and its relationship to the United States. He also explores how his own family story is part of the tumultuous story of the world's first Islamic democracy.

"A huge impetus for me in writing this book was actually being on both sides of this present conflict, where America is involved in this war in Afghanistan," Mufti tells NPR's Arun Rath. "As we know, the place of Pakistan in this conflict is very dubious and questionable."

Read more

4:05am

Sat September 28, 2013
Author Interviews

On Eliot's 125th, His 'Waste Land' Hasn't Lost Its Glamour

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 7:55 am

American-born British poet and playwright T.S. Eliot received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948.
Chris Bacon AFP/Getty Images

What do you get a Nobel Prize-winning poet for his birthday?

The poet, in this case, is T.S. Eliot, and this year he would have turned the intimidating age of 125. It's a tough question, but New Yorker poetry editor Paul Muldoon has got an answer: a new re-issue of the first edition of Eliot's groundbreaking poem, The Waste Land.

Read more

3:25am

Sat September 28, 2013
Author Interviews

I, Spy: Valerie Plame Makes Her Fiction Debut In CIA Thriller

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 9:16 am

Valerie Plame was outed as a covert CIA operative in a 2003 Washington Post column. Her story was depicted in the 2010 film Fair Game, starring Naomi Watts as Plame.
Dennis Cook AP

Vanessa Pierson, the heroine of Valerie Plame's first novel, is — ahem — "blonde, lithe, and nicely sexy." She is also a CIA agent, determined to lasso a nuclear arms dealer named Bhoot before he arrives at an underground nuclear facility in Iran.

But just as her informant is about to tell her where Bhoot will be, he's shot by a sniper who misses Vanessa — or does he simply overlook her? How will Vanessa Pierson halt the terrorists, protect the world and, by the way, also keep the secret of her forbidden romance with David, a fellow CIA ops officer with green-flecked hazel eyes?

Read more

1:04am

Fri September 27, 2013
Author Interviews

Diane Ravitch Rebukes Education Activists' 'Reign Of Error'

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 6:11 am

Yunus Arakon iStockphoto.com

Diane Ravitch, a former assistant secretary of education, spent years advocating for an overhaul of the American education system. She supported the No Child Left Behind Act, the charter school movement and standardized testing.

But Ravitch recently — and very publicly — changed her mind. She looked at the data and decided that the kinds of changes she'd supported weren't working. Now she's a prominent critic of things like charter schools and school choice — and she's particularly opposed to privatizing schools.

Read more

Pages